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A Golden Age: A Novel
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A Golden Age: A Novel

4.2 13
by Tahmima Anam
 

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Rehana Haque, a young widow, blissfully prepares for the party she will host for her son and daughter. But this is 1971 in East Pakistan, and change is in the air.

Set against the backdrop of the Bangladesh War of Independence, A Golden Age is a story of passion and revolution; of hope, faith, and unexpected heroism in the midst of chaos—and of one

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Golden Age 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can you show me again
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Come on everyone I am holding a clan meeting back at camp."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Follows..moonpaw and sunpaw raced out...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful novel that explores the consequences of genocide and war on motherhood and family. Beautifully written, bursting with vivid imagery and heart wrenching emotion. Can one find gold beneath the debris? How does it feel to lose one's children twice? A must read for all interested in post-colonial literature and the tragedies we choose not to see.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I found this novel to be intriguing and heart wrenching. Having no real knowledge of the story of Bangledesh, the historical backdrop to this book was interesting, and the profound love this mother feels for her children to resonate.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book from the beginning. As a Bangladeshi, I could totally relate to the tale of this enriching novel. I was unable to put this book down until the end. A Golden Age is a book that goes beyond the history of Bangladesh, but into the diverse characters and events of the country.
fitz12383 More than 1 year ago
Meet Rehana Haque. A widowed mother of two in 1970s East Pakistan, Rehana would do anything for her children. Shortly after her husband's death, Rehana allowed her brother-in-law to take custody of her two children for a year, and she never lets herself forget it. She is a devoted mother, perhaps to a fault, and the unchanging love of a mother for her children is at the forefront of this novel about the war for Bangladesh's independence. This novel starts out strong, but without a baseline knowledge of the Bangladesh War for Independence, the reader could easily feel a little lost. Also, I had a very hard time making a connection with Rehana's two children, Sohail and Maya. I found that I didn't really care what happened to the characters in the novel. Luckily, the second half of the novel takes on a suspenseful edge as the war and the Haque family's involvement in the resistance increases. The last chapters are page turners indeed, and makes this book worth reading.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just had tea at my rich friends house in the Dhanmondi, Dhaka and we mildly talked about how bad things were in 1971 in Dhaka,Bangladesh. That is the taste I have in my mouth after reading this ¿Historical¿ novel. Prelude: I barely survived the heinous Bangladesh Genocide of 1971. My Uncle and Grandfather were mercilessly butchered via bayonets to their guts and their dismembered bodies thrown into the river never to be found again. As an American Bangladeshi, I pre-ordered this book, rather with high anticipation. In all my eagerness, I wanted this to do justice to the rape and murder and mayhem that I was lucky to live through. The anticipation was that it would be at least of the caliber of Monica Ali's 'talented Bangladeshi author' wonderful book 'Brick Lane¿, especially after the reviews I had read. This is a very lucrative idea but completely misses giving the essence of WAR! WAR is bloody hell, and not 'GOLDEN', even if the house that the book is set in is sonar 'golden.' This book keeps on whimpering out. After reading the book and listening to the audio, I Am I drinking whiskey in today's corrupt world of Dhanmondi, Bangladesh talking about how things were in 1971 or am I reading about thre was of the opinion 'especially with Madhur Jaffrey¿s narrating' that I had heard a book on current Paki flavored Bangladeshi cooking with war thrown in for good measure. If this book is to portray the world of genocide, it does not. And it does not because it cannot break out of this Dhanmondi scene aura even with this stretched scene in Augortola, India thrown in. The flavor of 71 was in the countryside, it was in lakes and rivers around Dhaka with bloated dead Bangladeshi bodies that looked like balloons someone had blown up with crows and vultures sitting on them and ripping out stinking rotting carrion. For selecting a subject that no one in the English language has written a historical novel, bravo! Five Starts for cover design! Five stars for publicity and press. But, ONE STAR FOR THE REAL FEEL OF BLOODY WAR. FIVE STARS for a historical novel that no one has yet written in English language. I realize the author was born after 71 and did not spend time in Bangladesh. I was born and brought up in the Dhanmondi area and lived through this bloody hell of nine months that I will never forget as the most horrific experience of my life. There are just too many heinous errors in wielding the words of English and the book is verbose to a greater extent. Less is best. I applaud the effort. I cannot in good faith applaud the result.