×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care
     

Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care

4.3 3
by John Dittmer
 

See All Formats & Editions

In the summer of 1964 medical professionals, mostly white and northern, organized the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR) to provide care and support for civil rights activists organizing black voters in Mississippi. They left their lives and lucrative private practices to march beside and tend the wounds of demonstrators from Freedom Summer, the March on

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lg4154 More than 1 year ago
This was an interesting read that took a little bit of time to read. You really have to be in a certain mindset to read it. I liked it and it amazed me on what the Doctors went thru during the Civil Rights Era. Not just the black Doctors, the white ones as well. Plus there is added insight in what the black patients and lower income persons as well. I really stopped and made me think the entire time period and what many people endured during this time. I think all people should read this book and it would help to have a better understanding on what both races went through. Not only the problems the Doctors faced, but the nurses as well. I really liked the afterward that gave updates on what each Doctor went on to do after the Civil Rights movement.
authorsamoliver More than 1 year ago
This book outlines a process whereby health care is a human right and not a priviledge. The medical committee for human rights in their committment for social justice in health care creates a path into healing that is attainable. It has long been noted that money buys you better care. This book is an attempt to share ideas on how this is not necessary and what can be done to elicit care as a fundamental obligation to all.