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The Good Fairies of New York
     

The Good Fairies of New York

4.2 18
by Martin Millar, Neil Gaiman (Introduction)
 

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The Good Fairies of New York tells the fish-out-of-water story of two Scottish thistle fairies who find themselves in Manhattan. The fairies hook up with two humans, Kerry (complete with colostomy bag) and Dinnie (antisocial in the extreme), finding time to help both get their acts together. A book that brings together race riots and Scottish folklore,

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The Good Fairies of New York 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I heard of Martin Millar from Neil Gaiman's blog. Neil Gaiman praised Martin Millar's wisdom, wit and solid writing in 'The Good Fairies of New York' -- and mentioned it a few more times. I loved the premise of punk rock fairies and wanted to check it out, but couldn't afford it. Finally, when (August 23, 2003, in the blog) Neil's assistant Lorraine was cited as claiming that Millar's as-of-yet unpublished book 'Lonely Werewolf Girl' might be the best book ever written, and then (Novemeber 2003, at Sequential Tart) Neil namechecked him again, I made it my mission in life (I'm a writer, bookseller and rare book scout) to track down a damaged copy. They wanted $54 for a scrunched copy of the Collected with a bite out of the back cover and the title page torn out. (I paid $38 plus $4 shipping, but -- at this point, rabid -- I really needed it.) I've only read 'The Good Fairies of New York' and have two entire Millar novels to go. It's ingenious. He ambles between traditional fairy motifs and the Gods of Punk Rawk. Deftly and cheerfully, he spins the stories of characters that mainstream bestsellers tend to skip. Millar's favorite writer, according to his website, is Jane Austen. It shows. Whimsically and precisely, with a fun plot that turns corners on a dime, all sorts of delicious mayhem ensue. If you've ever wanted Johnny Thunders of The New York Dolls to come back from heaven to find his lost guitar, or if you've ever wondered why reels can be so tricky on the fiddle, or if you've tired of some of the more traditional types of fantasies, the book's for you. If you're as poor as I am, get Kelly Link's 'Stranger Things Happen' or Matt Ruff's 'Set This House in Order' or Jonathan Carroll's 'White Apples.' They're all in print in paperback. But if you've read those (and Gaiman and Kiernan and Mieville and the others pushing things forward), then treat yourself to 'The Good Fairies of New York.' It's wrong that it's out of print and so expensive, but it's oh so worth it.
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BookedUp More than 1 year ago
Um... what? This seemed promising in a quirky, imaginative way. I was looking forward to a fantasy adventure that would make me smile and spread the word about what fun this strange little book was. Yeah, not so much.

This was the first Millar book I picked up and during the first few chapters I held onto hope that somewhere along the line it would pull me in and a wonderful story would emerge. But more than half-way through the characters still mean very little to me, the fairies are immature, self-centered, and rude, and the human characters not much better.

There are so many different fairies and fairy affiliations (no, really, it's a little fairy world in there) that it would be difficult to keep track of under the best of circumstances, but when the names are not easily pronounced, even in your head, and the characters are not developed enough to even care who they are or why they're doing what they're doing, it just leaves the reader with a lot of jumbled, winged creatures flapping around the brain.

Millar seems to have a lot of talent, but for some reason it doesn't work in this book. At least not for me. I cannot finish it. Life is too short and my book stack too tall with more promising journeys awaiting.

Let the record show that I do believe in Millar though - I have his book, Lonely Werewolf Girl and am still looking forward to reading it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished this book, and actually set aside two other reads to get through it. I thought it'd just be a light read, for it's not very long, but it was an amazing roller coaster. I loved how things got worse and worse, but it wasn't as negative as it could've been. I thought they'd never get that Welsh Poppy! I'd reccomend it to anyone that didn't get easily offended 'there are some f words tossed around and a lot of dirty commercials..which I think is hilariously realistic but perhaps a little more dirty then your average american broadcasting'. I actually gave my copy away on a plane after I was done, because this book needs to travel well.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the funniest, and most clever books I have read. Millar is smart and sophisticated with a fast paced story that reminds me of a book form of Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels. Take Neil Gaiman's advice 'Read it now, and then make your friends buy their own copies'
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finished this book very reluctantly because I wanted to push to see any redeeming qualities in it. It has such a cute plot but has totally been ruined by random TV sex commercials that are so gross its pretty annoying and totally throw the whole book off. It's so freaky that this isn't in the adults section instead of young readers! I'm a teenager myself and this irritated me to no end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ok, so I read the book. Pushed myself to finish it, thinking it might have gotten better....nope! If Miller would have concentrated more on the bulk of the story, it could have been better. The fairies were interesting, but it was the weird sex commercials and the Chrone's disease descriptions that bored and disgusted me. Basically, I think I should have just put it down and read something better or never bought it in the first place.