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The Great Typo Hunt: Two Friends Changing the World, One Correction at a Time
     

The Great Typo Hunt: Two Friends Changing the World, One Correction at a Time

3.8 14
by Jeff Deck
 

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The signs of the times are missing apostrophes.
 
The world needed a hero, but how would an editor with no off-switch answer the call? For Jeff Deck, the writing was literally on the wall: “NO TRESSPASSING.” In that moment, his greater purpose became clear.  Dark hordes of typos had descended upon civilization… and only

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The Great Typo Hunt: Two Friends Changing the World, One Correction at a Time 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Great Typo Hunt is a fantastic read that honestly had me laughing out loud at times (usually on a crowded bus or train). It's a road trip story of two friends who have a crazy idea: drive around the country correcting typos. Their adventures and the typos they find along the way not only make you laugh but also make you want to cry at what some of these mistakes say about the American population. They found over 400 typos on their trip and learned a lot about society along the way. A part that really resonated with me was when they discussed people's innate fear of looking stupid. Many people along the way would rather leave the sign incorrect then admit that they had made an error. They discussed how people sometimes limit their written vocabulary in an attempt to hide their lack of understanding about spelling and grammar. As a young child I remember being told that I could never be smart because I was a bad speller. An even now, as an adult with an BA from an Ivy league institution and an MBA from one of the top business schools in the country, I still find myself dumbing down emails, texts, Facebook posts, and even book review posts in an attempt to hide my inability to spell. That section not only shook me to the core but made me realize that I was not alone. Trust me, something about this book will resonate with you. And if nothing else, you will certainly understand proper apostrophe usage and you will become aware of the immense amount of typos that exist in the written text you pass by every day. If you like travel, adventure, or even grammar, this book is a great read and will have you discussing it with friends for days.
SheilaDeeth More than 1 year ago
I remember reading about "the great typo hunt" in the papers-which are, of course, a valuable source of lesser typos. I'm not particularly good at spotting errors in casual writing, or at spelling either, though I do know the rules and can usually apply them with a little help from my computer. So I reserve a special sympathy for those whose signage lacks accuracy. Also, I like rebelling against a teacher mother and a husband who's very detail-oriented. "Play In Doors or Out" evokes quiet smiles from me and thoughts of what type of story a child playing in a door might one day produce, but it rarely causes pain. Still, with a book like The Great Typo Hunt those quiet smiles might be quickly overtaken by laughing out loud. Jeff Deck and his fellow typo-hunters certainly found a fun and intriguing collection, and tell the tale quite delightfully, with all the right accompaniment of hilarious images and self-doubt-do we need rules, who sets the rules, why are the rules how they are, and who can learn them anyway? (In fact, the book even ends with a pretty clear description of the rules-if only I'd been taught them as a kid, instead of picking them up from sitting in classes where my own kids were learning-bad habits are so hard to lose.) Jeff Deck set off on a trip around the States to correct typos, using his natural skills to better the world of American signs, and communicating with a wealth of fascinating people on the way. Benjamin D. Herson accompanied him on part of his journey, most significantly on the part that garnered the greatest newspaper attention. And I found myself with vague memories of the story evolving into a court case at some point, instead of an "isn't this interesting" segment at the end of the news. Meanwhile readers share the journey, enjoying the triumph of an occasional "Yes, please fix it," the adrenalin rush of the stealth correction, and the agony of those mistakes yet left unmended, still tormenting passers-by. The story is told with amusing candor in non-threatening tone with educational overtones, and lots to think about. It's truly a delight, zany in a fine intellectual way, poignant in an oh-what-a-crazy-world-we-live-in kind of way, and thought-provoking too-a pleasingly descriptive trip across and around the States as well as an investigation into people, defensiveness, education and communication. When this book comes out in paperback I shall buy my own copy. Meanwhile I'll thank a friend for lending her hardback to me, and I'll thank my computer for spell-check and grammar-check. Disclosure: I borrowed this book from a friend who bought it from a store where one of the authors works. Perhaps I'll meet him one day.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Yago98 More than 1 year ago
Mid way through this book, you have to stop and wonder how smart are fellow man is. Some of the spellings or misspelled words you see in this book are just too funny to understand....
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capotegirl More than 1 year ago
Tedious and overblown; save your time and money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I ordered this book because I am 1) a former English teacher and 2) a longtime professional writer and editor with a sharp eye for typos. I was disappointed and bored. I am on page 88 and already skimming in hopes of getting to the end. I expected something witty and amusing. Instead, it's heavy going: ponderous and pretentious.