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Hoax (Butch Karp Series #16)
     

Hoax (Butch Karp Series #16)

3.4 14
by Robert K. Tanenbaum
 

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The shooting death of a rap mogul is the first link in a sinister chain ensnaring New York District Attorney Butch Karp. With his wife and daughter on a New Mexico retreat, Karp is left to fend for his teenaged sons and himself. Descending into the hip-hop underworld to prosecute a killer, Karp comes head-to-head wih Andrew Kane, a powerful would-be mayor whose

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Hoax (Butch Karp Series #16) 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Jo_Webnar_Author More than 1 year ago
Tanenbaum is a great writer, but he can be a little wordy for me, and that's why I gave him 4 stars. Butch Karp and Marlene Ciampi are rich and complicated three dimensional characters.I love the way he develops them, but sometimes he "rambles." Tanenbaum is not an easy read because there is lot going on and several complex plots are interwoven. He's a dark writer that doesn't pull any punches describing our inadequate legal system. When I want a book that is great suspense and makes me think, I'll read Tanenbaum.If you like suspenseful legal thrillers, this is the book for you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yes, this is a complicated (for the genre) book with several storylines interwoven, but it is richer, with better character development and more understanding of their motives than any in the past books of this series, which I enjoyed but now think of as 'Karp-Lite.' If anything, this book is anything but cliche (what would someone who reads this genre have to complain about re: cliches ... it is a genre built on them), Hoax almost flips too much the other way. As for white author writing rap lyrics ... does anybody write good rap lyrics? And there are about eight lines of them in a HUGE book. Yes, the author (whomever he or she may be) is different than the former ghost writer who assists Mr. Tanenbaum, with a different style, but I was growing tired of the former and thoroughly enjoyed this change of pace and look forward to Fury, the next in line.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are plenty of reasons not to like this book: 1) A middle aged, white, author writing rap lyrics 2) 'putting phrases' in 'quotation marks' on almost 'every' page of this 'book' 3) Cliche after cliche after cliche 4) Beginning almost every chapter in the present tense, and then narrating from a few days back to get us right where we started at the beginning of the chapter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just wasted 6 hours on an airplane with this book. Perhaps one of the poorest that I've ever read. This book had no business being published. Someone owes me $6.95 and 6 hours of my life. I have no problem with the author as I'm sure he's done his best. I have a problem with the publisher, the editor and the agent. These people should be held accountable for allowing this garbage to make it to the bookshelf.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tannenbaum's earlier Karp series books have an uncanny ability to be set in any decade in the last thirty years. . .this one was his first definite foray into the new millenium. He tackles a bunch of issues: the fierce world of rap music, the mass of people indulging in new age thinking, and corruption in both church and state. And unbelievably, Tannenbaum weaves these issues together skillfully, if not altogether believable. However, like any thriller, there is a certain level of suspension of disbelief. This was, without a doubt, one of his best. Marlene and Lucy reconstructing their relationship, and Tran reappearing. . . with possible entanglements with a new hero (the chief). . .all of this made the book well worth the time. A true page-turner.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have no idea how the other reviewers of this book did not give it at least four stars. I've read nine of Tanenbaum's books in the Butch Karp series over the last three months, and I found this one to be as good if not better than the other eight. Once again, his subplots are interwoven, but the reader doesn't find out how until the last few pages of the book. This book was an incredible page-turner, and well worth a look.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished this book last night and I'm a little disappointed, not necessarily at the book itself - the rating says it, 'OK but not great' - but because it wasn't at all what I was expecting. I've read all of the Butch Karp novels at least once, and I have to say that I agree with some other reviewers - it was as if someone else wrote this book. The voice and tone were different, and the characters were saying and doing things that didn't fit with their words and actions in previous books. I mean, Butch Karp trading pop music trivia with Dirty Warren? Ray Guma carrying a shotgun? Give me a break! It's like when some people other than Conan Doyle tried to write Sherlock Holmes mysteries - they weren't necessarily bad, and they got it almost right, but not quite. It was a very strange reading experience.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Readers expecting the high level of writing and characterization of the previous titles in this series will be disappointed in this latest one. No matter who wrote it (a controversy that's been raging since it was published), it clearly wasn't whoever wrote the earlier books, and it's barely worth the paper it was printed on.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have good reason to believe that there is an orchestrated attempt by friends and even family of the former 'ghost' writer of this series to knock this book on these online reviews--apparently a feud between the ghost and Mr. Tannenbaum. (As for complaints about 'ghost' writers, come on A LOT of what we read in popular series are written by ghosts). As a long-time fan of the Karp series, I have no axe to grind one way or the other. And I can see where some fans of the original series might prefer the original author. Some people get used to a certain flavor and don't like change. I suppose if you are one of those who couldn't take Pierce Brosnan replacing Sean Connery as Bond, you might have the same problem here. But while I loved first books too, to be honest, I found this one to be richer, the characters more fully painted, including we finally understand some of the motivations for our favorite crime fighting family. I was truly moved by the death of Karp's mother and how it was related to his unceasing battle against evil. Yes, this book is more 'novelesque' than the first fifteen, which stayed tried and true to the crime thriller structure. But I enjoyed it and am glad this 'ghost' didn't try to mimic the original, but instead took the characters and made them his own--with I suspect a good deal of guidance from Mr. Tannenbaum (perhaps this was the cause for the feud). If I had a complaint about the book it's that for all its great length (it is far longer than any previous Karp book), the ending came too quickly and a bit too easily. As a result I would have given it four stars, but having heard about this feud from an excellent source, I felt the need to combat bad reviews that are not being given for the right reasons. Read the reviews from Kirkus, Publisher's Weekly, Booklist and from folks who just seem to be fans of a good read ... even ignore this one ... but read the book and make up your own mind.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not as good as the previous excellent stories of Marlene and Butch. I miss the dogs, and Tran, and the old Marlene, and wanted more of Lucy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a tedious rehash of the previous books in this series, which were all terrific. this is poorly written, boring, and clearly shows that the person the author thanked for all his help in the earlier books didnt help him in this one. Dont waste your money.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Four black people including a well known West Coast gangsta-rapper are killed in New York City. The singer ML Rex was forming his own production company while leaving the record firm owned by Andrew Kane, the next mayor of the city. Kane owns the police, and the church¿s archbishop and his assistant. He uses bribes, blackmail, frames (as he did with the rapper murder) and fame to get what he wants. He forces I.A. to declare crooked cops innocent and persuades church members not to sue the priests who performed sexual acts on their parishioners.................................. The District Attorney of New York Butch Karp thinks of running for office but that doesn¿t prevent him from taking on the Church hierarchy, a politician who has ordered the deaths of those who get in his way, and the rank and file of the police. Butch¿s problems spill over to his wife Marlene and their daughter Lucy who are on a retreat in Taos. The Church has sent its problem priests to a medical facility there to rehabilitate them. Kane orders Marlene and Lucy¿s deaths, thinking her husband sent her there to investigate the medical unit. Both Karp and Marlene are not frightened off by attempted hits on their lives and they intend to bring the guilty parties to justice....................... This is the sixteenth Butch Karp novel and it is every bit as original and exciting as the first novel in this thrilling series. Robert K. Tanenbaum writes a great crime thriller that humanizes the protagonist by allowing readers to see him as a family man. There is plenty of action in this novel but Mr. Tanenbaum also gives plenty of space for character development.............................. Harriet Klausner