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How to Be Happy: (No Fairy Dust or Moonbeams Required)
     

How to Be Happy: (No Fairy Dust or Moonbeams Required)

4.2 10
by Cara Stein
 

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It's not easy being happy in today's world. Let's face it, most people don't enjoy their lives much. Between their jobs, money worries, too many things to do, and too little time, most people are lucky to have one hour of happiness a week.

Don't settle for that! Even if you have a pretty good life, maybe a B+, you can have more. You can build the life you want and

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How to be Happy (No Fairy Dust or Moonbeams Required) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay, to be perfectly honest, I pictured the author cheery faced, smile from ear to ear, overly caffeinated and typing away into the wee hours of the morning. Optimism has always annoyed me, as I favored realism - but that sure hasn't made me happy! I'm a stickler for grammar and the typos bothered me a bit, but there are best sellers out there chock full of typos (does ANYONE use editors abymore?). What matters is, this book has some valid points and great ideas. I am as depressed as they come, with a slew of trauma and chemical imbalances all working against me - this book got me through a night that may have otherwise landed me back in the ward. Yes, it is quite idealistic - if you have severe trauma like me, this book will not replace your therapist or meds. However the author doesn't claim it will. The part about the neocortex containing the human spirit is of no factual evidence and thus makes me question the validity of any of the medical parts mentioned - but from what I do know, the explaination of the rest made a good amount of sense. Also I can't leave out a certain Esquire employee mentioned sounds like a total selfish jerk, but what the author took from the story about said Esquire employee can be quite useful. All in all, this book has a lot of methods that could greatly reduce ones stress if applied consistently, and I definitely plan on using many of them. I wouldn't have regretted paying for this book, but clearly the authors selflessness is just another testament to how her knowledge and creativity really did pay off in her life - and she is offering that to the world for free. That's enough to make me question my misanthropic lifestyle and wonder if happiness isn't a lost cause for me afterall.
Valter Viglietti More than 1 year ago
The author knows the topic, and her advice is quite useful (although, at times, a bit generic). If you ponder about your life and values while reading it, and you apply at least some of the content, you're very likely to get an improvement in your life. It takes effort, though - reading is not enough!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There is so much good information.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really interesting book, i found it to be helpful and will tell other to give it a try!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very clear and concisse. Easy to understand. Practical things you can apply in your life without much effort.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written. Practical advice. I love the critical vs advocate me and the take on caring about multiple life issues like relationships giving and health. I am keeping this one. Wonderful and bravo to the author!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago