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If I Can't Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of Her Children
     

If I Can't Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of Her Children

4.2 17
by Gregg Olsen
 

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In If I Can't Have You, bestselling author Gregg Olsen and co-author Rebecca Morris investigate one of the 21st Century's most puzzling disappearances and how it resulted in the murder of two children by their father.

Every once in a great while a genuine murder mystery unfolds before the eyes of the American public. The tragic story of

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If I Can't Have You: Susan Powell, Her Mysterious Disappearance, and the Murder of Her Children 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an electrifying true story, including the horrible tragedy of Susan’s two young sons being murdered. Much of the details in this book were not made public to the news media, so it is just not reliving the whole time Susan’s disappearance was in the news, but includes many more details of her life before and after her disappearance, as well as details of other family members (of both Susan and her husband Josh, including their two little boys). A riveting read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Overwhelmingly sad but true story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was such a tragically sad story. So frustrating the Susan has never been found and there are no definitive answers to this troubling mystery. It is also incredibly frustrating that Steve Powell must only serve 30 months for his sick crimes perpetrated on innocent women and girls. I pray that Susan, Charlie, and Braden are resting in peace together in Heaven and that their family and friends can find peace knowing that...
LindaHB More than 1 year ago
If I Can't Have You is the sad recount of crime which affected--and ruined--so many lives. As is typical of Olsen's work, so many details are included, indicative of immense research by these authors. These details, supporting the story as it evolves, capture and keep the reader's attention. This book will be a satisfying read for readers of true crime as well as many other genres. I found that I needed "decompression" time after reading this book absorb all of the story and contemplate the effects of this heartbreaking story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tragic true crime
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I live a couple miles feom the desert where he dumped her body. Josh Powell is a sick man. I cant believe he was demented enough to do that. It makes me so sick.
Marlene55MD More than 1 year ago
I feel sorry for Susan and hope they find her. But as for her husband and her father-in-law they were both screw balls. I also can not see how a father could do that to his children butcher them and set the house on fire with them in it. Why could he not just kill him self and leave a note what he did with Susan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very interesting to read. On the one hand, its an incredibly sad story and is written very well. On the other hand it was absolutely infuriating to read about the police and their lack of effort in this case and allowing such a tragedy to happen on their watch. As someone who gets very emotionally involved in their books, this one had me seeing red at times!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writing style was wonderfully riveting and the story itself a tragedy- I cannot fathom living through what the Coxes have gone through; and the pain Susan must have suffered physically and emotionally. While all taking of human life is despicable, it is more so when there is never closure of being able to put a loved one to rest, and having innocent lives taken by a parent who is supposed to protect them. Many times I found myself wishing that I could turn back time so I could warn her, be that annoying friend who tells her to get out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never wanted to put the book down. Incredible story, not many down periods, took a long time to get to the murder of his sons. Overall an excellent book!
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JEN-E-- More than 1 year ago
The authors, Greg Olsen and Rebecca Morris, have really outdone themselves. It is impertinent to the story that Susan Powell predicted her own demise as told in chapters one through fifteen. Her retold thoughts and actions, I feel, are haunting and authentic. Her two sons, Charlie and Braden were, no doubt, her entire world. All women should know those feelings at some point during their lives. She was an attractive, passionate woman with every reason to live. Her birth, parents and friends affirmations are testaments to that. Chapters sixteen through forty four detail the plight of her psycho husband, Josh Powell and his family: The Powells. It also gives the testimonies of Susan Powells' family, namely her father, Chuck Cox, and friends who forsaw her plight as inevitably doomed. The text does ramble on and on, stating that Josh Powell planned her disappearance, the murder suicide of their boys and the predictions of both outcomes from EVERYONE in Susan Powells' life. The text does state what was going on in Josh Powells' mind as if everyone were professional mind readers. That was annoying. Chapters thirty six through forty two critically examines the custody battle between Grandfather Chuck Cox and Josh Powell for Charlie and Braden Powell; their psyche as depicted throughout their mother's disappearence by family member's and friends; their deteriorated physical appearance; their sexual health; their subsiding poisoned outlook on Grandfather Chuck Cox; their close interaction with other family members and friends, particularly their age; their school performance, hobbies, interests and love of animals. Chapter forty five is the eight and one half page account of the double murder suicide of Charlie, Braden and Josh Powell by the hands of father Josh Powell. Chapter forty seven is the almost three pages of the gory details. Suicide e-mail receivers Alina Powell, Jeffrey Basset, Nathan Leach and Pastor Tim Atkins were all way too late. 911 Operator David Lovrak was way to lax; 911 operator Rose was five times better; The third 911 operator did a little better than the first. Graham Fire and Rescue were lazy; Sheriff's deputies were ten times worse. Chaplin? Arrival times? Griffin-Halls call took seven minutes. If I were her, I would have commited suicide at her arrival time to Josh Powell's rental house at 11:57AM. Explosio was at 12:16. Fire 12:22 p.m. Cops 12:30 p.m. Chaplin 1:30 p.m. One to ten: I give law enforcement, The West Valley City Police Department a six and one half; The Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Child Protective Services, Elizabeth Griffin Hall, PhD and the Foster Care Resource Network a three; child custody Superior Court Judge Kathryn Nelson a four; mother Susan Powell a whopping ten; Josh Powell an eight as a father, and a one as a psycho Husband/Father. To The Coxes I would extend a ten; The Cox Family custody Attorney Steve Downing nine; The Cox family Attorney Anne Bremner a two; Minister Dean Curry, The Life Center Church and The Mormon Church an eight; Pastor Tim Atkins, his family and The Faith Bible Church a nine; Josh's father, Steve Powell, a negative one; brother Mike Powell a negative one; The Powells a two, with the exception of Josh's sister, Jennifer Graves, a big eight; Kiirsi Hellewell, Debbie Caldwell and Susan' Powell's friends, sisters and confidantes a nine; Josh Powell's Psychological Examiner, Dr. James Manley a one. The story is a must read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hea
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have given the book a high rating but in good faith I cannot give it the maximum score. I want to believe that the majority of the book is true but I am concerned that this book may qualify as fiction based upon actual events. First of all anyone that has ever written a research paper knows the importance of documenting sources. I challenge the readers to pick any statement (other than a direct quote) made in the book and tell me where I can find the source of the statement, such as “Sgt Somebody, Sandy City Police Report, page 3, dated 12 Dec 20xx”. There are no sources listed in footnotes or anywhere else in the book. Secondly once you read a statement presented as fact that is not true, then you must wonder about the authenticity of the rest of the “facts” stated in the book. Some of the potential untruths appear to be biases of the authors. When the authors state something like, “Josh Powell believed…” then I can accept that this is one persons opinion. But when the authors make a flat out claim of fact, then that claim needs to be accurate, there is no room for it being somebody’s opinion. For example I was surprised to read, on page 66, the statement indicating that Mormon scripture teaches women to be submissive. Based upon that statement I did my own research and this is what I found in the October 1995 General Conference of the LDS Church, “fathers are to preside over their families in love and righteousness and are responsible to provide the necessities of life and protection for their families. Mothers are primarily responsible for the nurture of their children. In these sacred responsibilities, fathers and mothers are obligated to help one another as equal partners.” Two key words at the end of this quote “EQUAL PARTNERS” refute the authors’ claim that the LDS church teaches their women to be submissive.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had gu problems...would you like to input?