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In Search of the Multiverse: Parallel Worlds, Hidden Dimensions, and the Ultimate Quest for the Frontiers of Reality
     

In Search of the Multiverse: Parallel Worlds, Hidden Dimensions, and the Ultimate Quest for the Frontiers of Reality

3.8 8
by John Gribbin
 

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Critical acclaim for John Gribbin

"The master of popular science."
Sunday Times (London)

"Gribbin explains things very well indeed, and there's not an equation in sight."
David Goodstein, The New York Times Book Review (on Almost Everyone's Guide to Science)

"Gribbin breathes life

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In Search of the Multiverse: Parallel Worlds, Hidden Dimensions, and the Ultimate Quest for the Frontiers of Reality 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While generally well written, this book ultimately breaks no new ground. Much time is spent on the idea of the Many Worlds concept and String Theory - but none of this material is new. One draws the conclusion that there is nothing new to be said at this point in time. The author briefly discusses the possibility that we live in a simulated reality, but quickly dismisses this using some very flawed thinking. This reveals a strong bias against a potentially interesting avenue of exploration. Saying that the simulation might have glitches and repairs that we would be sure to notice is a huge assumption. Humans would be part of the simulation, not independent observers. The creators of the simulation, according to the author, would be sure to lack the competence to make it work without errors. This is an absurd attempt to use the current state of human knowledge to judge something that would be far beyond our capability to understand. The author uses the term "fakers" to refer to whoever or whatever might be running such a simulation. Again, revealing a deep seated bias against new ideas, of which a simulated reality is just one. But, in the end, this book is at least a well written example of this current state of cosmological thinking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book can get tough to read in places. He has a lot of weird ideas about how things happen. However Quantum mechanics its self is unbelievable as well. I suppose it is in keeping with weirdness.
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