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Inda
     

Inda

4.5 39
by Sherwood Smith
 

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Acclaimed Inda series within Sherwood Smith's epic fantasy Sartorias-deles universe • Military fantasy woven with courtly politics, vast worldbuilding, and diverse characters

Indevan-Dal is the second son of the Prince and Princess of Choraed Elgaer, destined to become his elder brother Tanrid's Shield Arm-his military

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Inda (Inda Series #1) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Finnskeeper More than 1 year ago
I do not say this lightly, but I think this is the best overall fantasy series I have ever read. And that is saying a lot. Loved the world building, the characterization. The plot is very complex and not hackneyed as happens too much in Fantasy these days. I loved every book in the series and was left berift when it ended. Very well done. I wish the author would write more of this mature fantasy genre rather than the kitche YA stuff she also writes. The Inda series is one that I have already reread several times and is a keeper that will no doubt be reread many more times in the years to come.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having been a fan of Sherwood Smith's previous work Crown Duel, I bought Inda on pure faith. It easily blew away even my highest expectations! The world she creates is so fantastic and the characters so naturally defined that by the end of the first book you really feel as if you've lived along side them your whole life. Be prepared to be rabid for more!
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In short, the Inda series is the story of a boy who is exiled from the prestigious Marolven military academy. He is sent to sea. Captured by pirates, he leads a mutiny at the age of 16 and goes on to build his own fleet and then goes on to battle the Brotherhood of Blood that threaten his home, Iasca Leror. After 9 years, he returns home, this time to defend his land from and old enemy, the Venn. The characters the surround Inda are unforgettable, especially Savarend "Fox" Montredavan-An, whose descendents we will see later on in Smith's other books concerning Marlovens. I have never been captivated by any story like this before and I have come to adore Inda as much Smith obviously does when she wrote the book. It's hard to write a review after finishing all four books of this epic series, but Inda is definitely a book/series worth reading, if anyone cares for a good story at all. The depth of Inda's world is intense, enchanting, and addicting. Sherwood's craft of world-building is at its best in Inda.
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Ancamna More than 1 year ago
Incidentally, also the name of the main character, Inda is a story of a boy pushed into the realm of politics before he is really old enough to understand. But that's life, isn't it? The whole country (Iasca Leror) is having political troubles, and their northern neighbors want to invade -- only, they're a conquering empire, so the Iascans (the people they've conquered) don't believe the Marlovans (the conquerers) that the northern country (Land of the Venn) really wants to invade. And did I mention that the king's brother is a control freak who's exacerbating the situation? So Inda is framed for something by the king's brother and is exiled by the king (who's on Inda's side) and hires onto a ship. Stuff happens and pirates become involved. And everyone loves pirates, right? This book and the ones that follow are epic without having to save THE WORLD -- maybe just the country and perhaps it could have happened without their help anyway -- which brings it into focus in a way that resonates with the real world even though it's set someplace other than Earth. It's about finding new friends and keeping the old. It's about loyalty and politics and love and growing up and finding your place in the world and PIRATES. And everyone loves pirates, yeah?