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Intern: A Doctor's Initiation
     

Intern: A Doctor's Initiation

4.0 23
by Sandeep Jauhar
 

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Intern is Dr. Sandeep Jauhar's story of his days and nights in residency at a busy hospital in New York City, a trial that led him to question his every assumption about medical care today. Residency—and especially its first year, the internship—is legendary for its brutality, and Jauhar's experience was even more harrowing than most. He switched

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Intern: A Doctor's Initiation 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
shout_from_the_backcorner More than 1 year ago
I am currently an intern who has the luck of being on a rotation which affords me enough time to read. I suspect that the author and I differ substantially in our attitudes to things, and yet this book clearly communicates the frustrations and dilemmas which inhabit the medical professional's training today. I thought Dr. Jauhar's book was painfully honest, and this itself makes it a valuable read for any intern; there is strength in knowing one is not alone in one's self-doubt and in one's struggle with the difficult ethical questions we are forced to face on a daily basis. My only criticism was that, in a few places I found the narrator a touch self absorbed. Otherwise, I recommend this book to upper level medical students and interns who have the time to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This often plodding tale of an intern's rollercoaster mood and his initial experiences as a fledging doctor will leave you alternately yawning and saying "oh, for pete's sake, grow up!" His uncertainty over his chosen profession is sometimes palpable. Does everyone question their chosen profession so often? One doesn't know whether to pity him or his patients. Eventually he hits his stride, but by then this reader was too tired to care.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. As a student going through medical school in the near future, I found this book very insightful and I loved the honesty in Dr. Jauhar. His book would be interesting and funny to anyone, no matter their professional choice!
LucasOlive More than 1 year ago
This book gives an insightful look into the struggles of the road to being a doctor, that perhaps not many people realized were present. Good read for anyone interested or curious about the field of medicine.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
tori moseley More than 1 year ago
This book was an easy read. Informative, polite, and 'to the point'. I really enjoyed this book.
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Dr. Jauhar has heard it before and he still doesn't have a clue. In his book Intern, he used 'the power of the pen', to retaliate against those who most likely, unknowingly, made him feel insecure. It is obvious to the reader that he never felt 'good enough' to be there. The character known as 'Dr. David Klein' (not his real name) was one of the most beloved physicians at NYH - anything but an elitist. Most of his patients were of the low-middle class socioeconomic status. He was kind to everyone, patients and staff alike.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an MBA who has very limited contact with physicians except for my yearly checkup. However, I have always been fascinated by the medical profession and especially how doctors 'survive' the training. This book was truly amazing because it allowed a non-physician to understand, appreciate and become a part of the training process. Kudos to the author. A great book for everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really don't understand the string of five-star reviews that this book received. The writing, for instance, is very poor, and the book reads like a rather dull episode of 'Grey's Anatomy' which it seems fairly clear the author is trying to imitate. The narrative skips around frequently, not for purposes of clarity but instead, seemingly, to make it impossible to follow the story chronologically, and the other characters are completely flat and one-dimensional, coming across as nothing more than a series of bland facial descriptions. Worst of all, however, is the narrator himself. I found his constant apathy towards his chosen profession wearying, rather than inspiring, and he seemed to have very little empathy for his patients, as he kept finding convoluted ways to compare his uncertainty to their pain or grief- in places it became nauseating. Perhaps, as a literary scholar and not an aspiring med student I am simply not the target audience for this memoir, but I took nothing away from this other than a mild feeling of annoyance and the knowledge that if I had ever been treated by an intern as inept as the author, I probably would have sued.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Jauhar tells his story of 'coming up' as a newly ordained man of medicine. Not only does he offer a great deal of insight to the non-medical reader what these young physicians go through after they are able to call themselves Doctor, he paints the picture of the struggles that young people go through as they emerge into their careers. This is a must read for any aspiring or currently training physician. In addition new college graduates in any field should read this story of the struggles that one must go through when they come down from the academic ¿ivory towers¿ and emerge into the real world. Dr. Jauhar tackles the ethical, professional and personal dilemmas of not only becoming a physician but becoming a balanced human being, advice which young people could certainly use in these ever confusing times in our society. A+
Guest More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book with some trepidation. Another doctor book!! However, I could not put it down. It describes in vivid, honest detail the struggles of a 1st generation immigrant from India who has to deal with the family pressures of pursuing a career in medicine with his own intellectual concerns about medicine. Jauhar writes in beautiful prose and is able to put to words that most physicians actually feel and went through during their internship. It is a great read and must reading for physicians, want- to-be physicians, college students considering a medical career, and the general public who are interested in the struggles of a physician and the inner workings of a medical system that is more concerned with throughput than academic curiosity
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is a brilliant, honest and touching memoir of one man's journey through his medical internship at New York Hospital. I could not put it down. I had no idea how grueling the process was. He has shared intimate details of his daily life on the wards, the stresses as well as the rewards. It will surely become a classic in its field. I also recommend it as one of the best books I have ever read. This book deserves as many stars as there are in the sky. DWD
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Jauhar captures not only the essence of the medical internship year, but bravely and boldly shares his inner conflicts with career choice, patient care dilemmas, the injustices of the medical care system, and some of the inhumanity of the training environment. After more than 30 years as an educator of medical interns and residents, I found Sandeep's book to be a veritable 'tour de force'...bringing a fresh, insightful perspective to this topic. This is 'must' reading for every medical student, all residents and training, the general public with an interest in the field, and also for those of us deeply involved in careers in post-graduate medical education
DANIELoBAUMa More than 1 year ago
"If not all Americans; 99.9% of U.S. available citizens will visit a practicing physician of some generalization or speciality at least once in their lifetime. Either, by keeping our hearts pumping, or our brains thinking, and even our body working...these doctors do it all! The true question is- how did they learn to magnificently carry out all these procedures and abilities? In this memoir, the readers are exposed to the success and failures Doctor Jauhar experienced in his internship in New York City years ago. Intern is simply a bridge and a highway into Dr. Sandeep Jauhar's past memories. The author, Doctor Jauhar, communicates to the readers as if he was in a one on one private interview with each individual reader. He has the ability to answer every solitary question on a reader's mind all while getting his audience captivated in the novel. All in all, Doctor Sandeep Jauhar's amazing ability to keep his readers in tact directly for all 291 pages is awe-inspiring! A+ Read!!"
joeyesteves More than 1 year ago
I felt the same way as an attending with some of my MD, PHD friends discussing patient care plans. My hope was to expediete discharge planning as a Hospitalist. Now I'm moolighting and during research in Cardiopulmonary arrest, ATLS.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sandeep Jauhar's story his trials and tribulation in the medical field is moving and inspirational. Throughout his internship he is able to move from self-doubt and uncertainty of the whole medical field to finding faith in the system which is inspiring for those looking to go into the medical field, but have their own doubts about it. The pressure he feels from his family pushes him into medicine against his doubt that the field leaves little room for creativity and he would find passion in it. Through his first year of internship Jauhar comes to find that the field of medicine leaves little room for doubt and the doctors seem to have little concern for their patients. As his internship comes to an end, he begins to comprehend that while being a doctor comes with a certain sort of callus attitude toward those they help, that in the end doctors are doing their best to save lives that otherwise would have been loss. Jauhar is constantly bringing up the ideas of self-doubt, conflicts with the profession he chose, uncaring behaviors of those around him, hope, love, family, and the true meaning of being a doctor. The insights he gives into the lives of an intern, the attitudes of doctors, and the doubt that comes from even the best of doctors is helpful to those deciding on whether or not to go into the medical field. His constant self-doubt makes him more relatable and human to the audience as well. His writing style is creative; however, it follows that of a Grey's Anatomy episode which may have been why I enjoyed it so much. Also, his descriptions of his patients suffering, his failure to help some due to sleep deprivation, and his failed attempts at learning, which in turn caused the patients more pain are not for those with weak stomachs. The in depth details of certain events are a bit too much, and while the majority of his story cause inspiration these events create unwavering doubt on whether doctors are doing good. It is also disturbing to know that sleep deprived interns are allowed to make critical decisions with the little experience they have from medical school. I would recommend this book to anyone who has doubts in the medical field or is looking into going into the medical field, but has personal doubts about it. I found it enjoyable to read and it helped me personally in ridding myself of any doubt I had of pursuing a career in medicine. This is Sandeep Jauhar's only book, but he has had several pieces printed in the New York Times.