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Invisible Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #17)
     

Invisible Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #17)

4.2 93
by John Sandford
 

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“A crackling addition to [the] Prey series” (Entertainment Weekly) from #1 New York Times bestselling author John Sandford.

In a wealthy Minneapolis neighborhood, two elderly women are bludgeoned to death. They are apparent victims of a random robbery, though nothing of value appears to have been stolen. But when Lucas

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Invisible Prey (Lucas Davenport Series #17) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 93 reviews.
XXXOOOBookwormOOOXXX More than 1 year ago
This story begins with two elderly ladies; a rich one and her maid who are beaten to death in a rather efficient and brutal manner. Upon investigation it is found that while some antiques and valuables are missing, there is certainly nothing valuable enough to in anyway justify the death of these two people. Or are there valuable items missing that simply have not been identified? As the body count increases past unsolved murders are slowly linked to these recent killings and Davenport finds himself involved in a very complicated and perplexing series of crimes which not only involve murder but the antique and art business. As always Sandford is able to tie the various seemingly unrelated cases together in rather unique ways. One of the things that I like about the Prey series is that Sandford has allowed his primary protagonist, Lucas Davenport to evolve and by that I mean he has allowed him to age and mature. As these novels progress (and `Invisible Prey' is a prime example of this) we find Lucas aging, maybe not so much mentally, but most certainly physically. This is only natural and I like it because I am aging myself and am certainly not the person I was ten, twenty, thirty or forty years ago. As always, Sandford has provided us with some despicable villains which must be dealt with. I note that the characters are not as insane or psychopathic as some of his earlier bad guys but this not make them any less evil. The story is well written as you would expect from a master story teller of the caliber of Sandford and the plost gives us many twists and turns which keep the pages turning. In this particular work very little is written about Lucas's wife which is probably best because in most of the recent novels about all she does is sleep anyway so her absence in this work is more of a blessing than anything. I highly recommend this book as the series has attested so long to it's preceding reputation. 
harstan More than 1 year ago
Minneapolis Police Detective Lucas Davenport leads a very sensitive investigation into the activities of Minnesota State Senator Burt Kline allegedly having sex with a minor. The consummate professional cop, Lucas is extremely careful with his handling of the official inquiry because he knows what a mess a media feeding frenzy would be with a politician-Lolita tryst. --- As he prepares to arrest Mr. Kline for sex with a fifteen year old, Lucas also is assigned the murders of wealthy widow Constance Bucher and her maid Sugar Rayette-Peeples in the former¿s mansion. Both were battered to death and the house ransacked. The first thought is a robbery turned ugly, as the affluent home is filled with valuable antiques. However, Lucas realizes that he has no idea whether anything was stolen so perhaps the murders were personal especially with the skulls smashed. As he continues his inquires, he soon finds a strange connection to the sleazy senator scenario, but identifying the killers still remains difficult and convoluted. ---- Though number seventeen in this long running police procedural, INVISIBLE PREY is a fantastic tale in which the two cases are appealing because of the strong key players ranging from victims, suspects, witnesses, ¿vultures¿ and participants, etc. Readers will appreciate Lucas¿ investigations as John Sandford provides his hero with not the usual suspects in what will prove to be a one sitting thriller. ---- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
johnwillie More than 1 year ago
A very good book and easy to read
RobertDowns More than 1 year ago
I love “That Flippin’ Flowers.” He may not be the main show or even a Romeo, but he’s one hilarious bastard. He may need to spend a bit more time at the range, and there’s the distinct possibility he’s more interested in writing and fly fishing than he is detective work, but that just makes him memorable and interesting. The usual suspects populate INVISIBLE PREY, so if you’re familiar with Lucas Davenport and Weather and Kidd, you’ll feel right at home. But if this is your first rodeo, then I should probably ask you “Where the hell have you been for the past 25 years?” By my calculations there are 24 Davenport novels and 8 Flowers novels, plus you have the Kidd novels, and yeah, I’m probably missing a few along with some screws. The pace jerked me more than a socket wrench; the bodies stacked up faster than a New York City morgue; there were antiques and robberies and a few dichotomies; and smack dab in the middle stood Lucas Davenport in all of his infinite glory. Was it the best Prey novel I’ve ever read? It’s really hard to say, because I’ve read them in spurts and squirts, but it’s a damn good read if you’re into that sort of thing. Robert Downs Author of Falling Immortality: Casey Holden, Private Investigator
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One of the best of the Prey series.
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Will keep you womdering from page one what are they up to now.
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This was an interesting read, but not page-turner suspense for me. I felt that I was being educated about art history & the business of art more than entertained or swept along w/the unfolding story ... & the end-game plot twist was so much more predictable than most J.S. efforts. I liked it, but I was ready for it to be over so I could move on in the series.
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JTLewis More than 1 year ago
John Sanford's 'Invisible Prey' is the 17th installment of his Lucas Davenport series.17th! Wow, I can't imagine, I'm only on my second book of my 1st series. Wow! Anyway, you can't write 17 books about the same character without doing something right. Mr. Sanford has again shown that he has the skills to get this accomplished. The synopsis of the story: In the richest neighborhood of Minneapolis, two elderly women lie murdered in their home, killed with a pipe, the rooms tossed, only small items stolen. It is clearly the random work of someone looking for money to buy drugs. But as Davenport looks more closely, he begins to wonder whether the items are actually so small and the victims so random-if there might not be some invisible agenda at work here. Gradually, a pattern begins to emerge, and it leads him to . . . certainly nothing he ever expected. Which is too bad, because the killers-and, yes, there is more than one of them-the killers are expecting him. Brilliantly suspenseful, filled with rich characterization and exciting drama, Invisible Prey is further proof that Sanford is in a class of his own As far as I can remember, this is my first reading in the Lucas Davenport series, but it will not be the last. The story of the series of murders that now plague the Twin Cities is well thought out and complete. The characters are believable, with what I think are just the right amount of deviant personality traits within Davenport's own investigators to make it personable and enjoyable. I of course wish I had started earlier in the series. Even though the main characters were introduced to the reader when they appeared, I would get lost with some of them as I read through, a common problem when one starts in the middle or the end of a series. There are parts of every investigation, both fictional as well as real, that I like to call 'The Long Boring Parts Between the Action' when I am writing. These are the parts of an investigation when the investigator is reading through files or making notes while trying to find a hidden clue or a thread between different crimes. In Invisible Prey, these scenes were laid out efficiently and interestingly, and were not the "anchor around the neck" that some readers find them in other books. To me, this is a very good indication to me of successful writing in this genre, and not an easy piece of writing to pull off, believe me. The action of the crimes and the subsequent investigation were well laid out, easily keeping your interest with the deviousness of the criminals and the tenacity of Lucas. Add in the sometimes almost slapstick antics and down-home outlook of the investigators and you end up with a real and thought provoking story. As a new writer in this genre, I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone who loves crime/mystery novels. JT Lewis