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Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956
     

Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956

4.1 12
by Anne Applebaum
 

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National Book Award Finalist
TIME Magazine's #1 Nonfiction Book of 2012
A New York Times Notable Book
A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2012
Best Nonfiction of 2012: The Wall Street Journal, The Plain Dealer

In the much-anticipated follow-up to her Pulitzer Prize-winning Gulag, acclaimed

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Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book held my attention the entire way through. The way that it was broken up enhanced how thorough the Soviet domination of Eastern European life was in the Stalinist Era.
rsdel03 More than 1 year ago
A well-research and well-written account of how the Soviet Union turned East Germany, Poland, and Hungary into satellite states in the decade after World War II. Accounts by people who lived these days enliven the account. A marvelous account of the changes to these societies--political, economic, cultural, and belief--during this period and the long-term consequences of these actions. A must read for anyone interested in the Cold War period.
CENY More than 1 year ago
Superb history of primarily Poland, East Germany and Hungary from 1944-1956, with some information about other Eastern Bloc countries during that period and until 1989, written in a very readable and engaging way. I visited Eastern Europe in 1990 and again in 1994, right after Communism, and the book didn't make out life there as nightmarish as it seemed to me (and as described by some people I met in Romania), but it seemed accurate; maybe I'm just desensitized to it after so many years.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book brings a tragic period of history to light. From the hope of peace and prosperity to the grinding reality of Soviet domination of Eastern Europe, the years immediately following WW II are brought to life by the author. As the drama unfolds one cannot help but wonder at what might have been had the Western powers not been so completely fooled by Stalin.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Actually only about 550 pages as 150 pages of notes and bibliography. That should have been a giveaway.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
dull reading.