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Jim Thorpe, Original All-American
     

Jim Thorpe, Original All-American

4.1 7
by Joseph Bruchac, Mike Lester (Illustrator), Rhonda Gowler Greene
 

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Jim Thorpe played professional football and major league baseball, and won Olympic gold medals in track and field. He'll be forever revered by the sports community and by his Native American community. Born on the Sac and Fox Reservation in 1887, Jim was sent as a young boy to various Indian boarding schools-strict, cold places that didn't allow their students to hold

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4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jim Thorpe original all american was a wonderful book to read over the month. to reall know he was a a real athlete icon for people every where that admires him. Jim was a fascinating man while reading Joseph Bruchac autobiography I think. Jim was a REAL athlete that not a lot of us can say for others, like winning Olympic gold medals in track and field, I haven't heard any other athlete doing what he did. Also he played pro football and MLB, that's a guy all kids can look up to if becoming a pro athlete.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
A great book which relates to the lives of native americans and tells us a clear understanding of Jim's life. A great sports book and a must read
Guest More than 1 year ago
What genre is Mr. Bruchac's book? It is not really autobiography, though at first it seems to be. The author writes in the first person, as if he is Jim Thorpe. The problem is that a character should fit with his times and, using this method, Thorpe does not 'fit' with his. Mr. Bruchac puts a new head on old shoulders, meaning he gives Jim Thorpe insights about his life that he would only have looking back on his life - from the present time. About halfway through the book, we realize we are reading more about Joseph Bruchac and his feelings 'about the way Thorpe was treated' than we are about Thorpe himself. This short-changes Jim Thorpe. The author has an ax to grind, which becomes repetitious and tiresome. It is possible to write about Jim's life - all the unfair things that happened in it - without becoming pedantic. Just presenting facts about the way things were for Thorpe would be enough. When writing an historical book, it is necessary to give references as to the sources of the facts. If some of the facts seem wrong, this can tip the reader from belief to disbelief. If you are an author writing about a particular figure, or figures - in this case, Thorpe and Pop Warner - you owe it to them to be accurate. Unfortunately, there are mistakes among Mr. Bruchac's 'facts', no references to back them up - not even an index. At the end of the book, he actually states he is not naming all his sources. Is this the best model for young readers on how to write history? My grandfather managed the W&J team mentioned in the chapter 'The 1912 Season'. They held the Carlisle Indians to a scoreless tie.
Guest More than 1 year ago
it was so exciting i saw the book in my ming as i read it.