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Just Let Me Lie Down: Necessary Terms for the Half-Insane Working Mom
     

Just Let Me Lie Down: Necessary Terms for the Half-Insane Working Mom

3.7 14
by Kristin van Ogtrop
 

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Kristin van Ogtrop knows she's lucky-fulfilling career, great husband, three healthy kids, and, depending on the hamster count, an impressive roster of pets. You could also say she's half-insane, but name one working mom who isn't.

Using stories and insights from her own life, van Ogtrop offers a lexicon for working moms everywhere. Terms and concepts illustrate

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Just Let Me Lie Down 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Heart2Heart More than 1 year ago
When a woman decides to start a job after becoming a mom or the other way around, there are countless statements that only women can truly relate to. We've all heard the saying, "I can bring home the bacon, fry it up in a pan..." yet so many of us find that simple statement overwhelms us to the point that sometimes that pan is too heavy for us to pick up some days or on others we'd like to wield that pan as a deadly object to answer one last request of us. Can you relate? In the book, Just Let Me Lie Down by Kristin Van Ogtrop, she defines these "momisms" in alphabetically order of what its like in the day to day lives of working moms. Here are just a few of the classics I enjoyed: Caller ID Malfunction: When you have dialed a number and cannot remember whom it belongs to, but the phone is ringing and it feels too late to hang up, in case someone has gotten up out of the chair on the other end to answer your call. Are you calling the pediatrician? Your boss? The plumber? It's anybody's guess. Just A Second: That eternity between when a child says he'll do something you've asked and when he actually gets around to it. Technological bipolarism: When you wake up on the morning and can't imagine how you would get through life without your Blackberry, but by bedtime you want to strap a bomb to it and blow it to smithereens. Young and restless: Your children at the dinner table. Based on my experience as a mother of three boys, eating dinner as a family is so stressful (see Unhappy Hour, page 216) that it feels like it should be a part of the workday. And yet we persist. As you can tell this book is such a welcome sigh of laughter and smiles for any mother that wonders if Calgon can truly take her away from it all. Trust me, this one is not to be missed. I received this book, compliments of Hachette Book Groups for my honest review and am so glad I read this one. It helped me realize that I am not the only one thinking these things or living them for that matter. I have an ally in Kristin and she is truly a 5 star rating. She is also the editor of Real Simple magazine, also a favorite of mine! The book is available in hardcover and eBook formats.
Rob_Ballister More than 1 year ago
Disclaimer: Not a working mom, not a mom, not even a woman. Still, very impressed with this book. Working mothers are a special breed. Having to balance the emotions, responsibilities, and sheer WORK of being a mom with the pressures of working outside the home is one of the most daunting tasks out there, and that special group is well deserved of a book that is easy to read, provides a little perspective, and on top of that, is pretty darn funny. JUST LET ME LIE DOWN is that book. Author Kristin van Ogtrop uses here experiences as both a mom and a magazine editor to pen a dictionary of terms every working mom needs. Some are just flat out funny. Most are funny with a bit of a message. A few are just pure genius. Throughout the book, the consistent theme is one of balance and perspective; sorting out what's important from what just gets in the way. It's a skill all of us could use, but that a working mom can't live without. Whether it be giving advice about Blackberry addiction, finding time to have dinner together, or just making sure to take some "me" time, van Ogtrop's dictionary can both educate and entertain any working mom who can find time to read just a few pages every so often. Again, though I'm not a working mom (I'm a working dad, but that's way different) I picked up some important nuggets from this book. In addition, I asked my wife to read it, because I think she will pick up a few things as well and that's an endorsement at least as good as anything I can write here. Warm, smart, well-written, funny, and easily digestible, JUST LET ME LIE DOWN makes a great gift for any working mom out there. Highly recommended!
bridget3420 More than 1 year ago
Kristin is blessed with a career of her own, a loving partner and three children, all of which leaves her in a state of exhaustion. This never-ending cycle can drive a parent mad. Even the best of parents need a break, a chance to just "lie down". Kristin reminds me of what I see as a typical mom. She loves her family more than anything else and needs to take some time out for herself. If you can relate to needing a little "me" time, this is the book for you.
jb70 More than 1 year ago
In the time since I became a mother seven years ago I have both worked and stayed home. I worked for the first year and a half of motherhood. After adding a second child to our family and trying a job sharing plan that didn't end up working out as planned which coincided with a decision to relocate across the country and sell our house (which meant I wouldn't be able to stay at that job anyway) I started staying home and I have been home now for a number of years. I know that the clock is starting to wind down to my going back to work outside of the home, but I also know in my heart that right now I am not ready to do that. This book works well for both working outside of the home moms and stay at home moms. I hate the fact that stay at home moms are viewed as not working, as if every day is a day off, but that is a whole different topic. Kristin van Ogtrop is the editor at Real Simple Magazine and has been working since before her first child was born. Her writing is funny and easy to read. I got through the book in just a few days mostly while I was nursing my son or winding down before bed. Each chapter is arranged with a letter and alphabetical listings of terms for moms. Some examples are "accounting error" when you accidentally have one more child than you can handle, "boredom fantasy" when you remember back to when you were much younger and actually had enough free time to be bored, "ignore the tray" where you must act like a waiter and not look at all that is on your plate otherwise it will all tip- just keep you head up and keep going and you will be fine, and "that-sounds-like-fun-I'll-try it!" where you end up thinking you can do more than you can and end up in a situation that may be uncomfortable or just a pain like having your house renovated while you are still living in it. Van Ogtrop is really funny, it is nice to read about other mothers who don't feel like they have it all together all the time. I really enjoyed the alphabetical nature of the book, it made it feel organized. Earlier this year I read a book called Mother Daze and this reminded me of that one. It was also written by a working mother who had three children and they both did a good job with relating to the reader and using humor. For all mothers and maybe even all women, there is such a balancing act going on in our lives with how much time to give to our jobs, our families and ourselves and it is so hard to achieve what feels just right for all of those areas and really, sometimes if we just managed to get a bit more sleep it would go smoother but it feels like there isn't enough time to get that rest since so much needs to be done and we just keep going around on this treadmill. I requested this book for review from Hatchette Books.
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Digby41 More than 1 year ago
I have no tolerance for this genre of cutesy musings. It has a certain tone, the tone of feature writing in the lesser women's magazines. This is what they call a bathroom book. Or a gift book, meaning a book you don't care to read.