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Karma and Other Stories
     

Karma and Other Stories

4.3 6
by Rishi Reddi
 

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In this sparkling collection, award-winning writer Rishi Reddi weaves a multigenerational tapestry of interconnected lives, depicting members of an Indian American community struggling to balance the demands of tradition with the allure of Western life.

In "Lord Krishna," a teenager is offended when his evangelical history teacher likens the Hindu deity to Satan,

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Karma and Other Stories 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rishi Reddi presents a superb collection of stories that aim to reflect the experience of the modern-day Indian in New England. I picked up this book because I took a class on multicultural women's lit in college and we read a few Indian authors, all of whom I enjoyed. When I saw that this was a new collection of Indian fiction, I immediately wanted to read it. I found the stories, though focused on a particular immigrant community, share an experience of feeling out of place in society (and even family) that anyone could relate to. The characters are beautifully written, and I couldn't help but be caught up in their stories. I felt invested in them, and really, isn't that the point of a good book? The characters are so different from each other, with ages ranging from children to the elderly, creating a variety of viewpoints. I highly recommend Reddi's collection of stories to those who enjoy everyday people and the problems that cultural differences can bring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Eydunvmtueisvdtuxtu tvnv yu n byvrughtu be utiy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
writeyourlife144 More than 1 year ago
Reddi's characters are unforgettable and vivid, as are their stories. She paints a true and beautiful portrait of Indian culture, and brings to light the struggles which immigrants of any country face as they attempt to retain their culture and its dignity. The stories stay with the reader long after they have been set aside despite their shortness of length. It is a book which is irrevocably important and moving.