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Kitchen Privileges
     

Kitchen Privileges

4.4 17
by Mary Higgins Clark
 

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Angela’s Ashes comes home to the Bronx in a brilliant, touching, charming, and bittersweet account of a childhood during the Depression from America’s Queen of Suspense.

Mary Higgins Clark’s memoir begins with the death of her father in 1939. With no money in the house—the Higgins Bar and Grill in the Bronx is failing and in debt,

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Kitchen Privileges 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Paula Archer More than 1 year ago
I have read almost all of Mary's books and I have love all of them, but I think so far this was the best. Getting to know about the write is great.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Mary Higgins Clark has been a best selling author of suspense for what seems forever though her first book was a bio of George and Martha Washington. Ms. Clark returns to the world of non-fiction with an autobiography that may be her best work to date. Ms. Clark warmly discusses her life growing up in the Bronx, a very harsh one due the Depression. Even more heartwarming is her ¿courtship¿ and first marriage that should have turned Ms. Clark into a romance writer instead of the queen of suspense. She follows this up with the tragedy of suddenly raising children, as a widow with income problems until her first sale brings in needed cash. Finally, she discusses her second chance at love with her second marriage. Throughout the book, Ms. Clark displays her love for writing without padding fluff or an outrageous scandal. Instead the author¿s myriad of fans and readers who enjoy a well written insightful biography will take delight with this encouraging story that does not apologize for Ms. Clark following her dreams and encourages others to do likewise. For attaining one¿s dreams is how to attain happiness. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first listened to this book on tape while driving from Cincinnati to Atlanta 3 years ago. I enjoyed the story so much I decided I wanted to buy the book. I was disappointed to find the book was no longer sold in stores. This past Christmas I received the Nook GlowLight from my husband and the first book I purchased was Kitchen Privileges. I am not much of a reader, but the way Mary Clark Higgins describes her life was so enlighting to me. She has had ups and downs in her life,as we all do, hearing and reading how she stayed on course was encouraging to me. If I ever come across the hard cover book, I will purchase it too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found a lot of myself in MHC. If you have an affinity for the old days and for writing--and also New York--you will especially enjoy this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Mary Higgins Clark and this is one of my favorites. Very well written!
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Bernimarie More than 1 year ago
I am at a point in my life where I can finally take time to read books. The one's I find most interesting are biographies. I have never read any of Mary Higgins Clark's novels, nor had I known anything about her--until now. She experienced so much love and happiness in her life--but also more than her share of sorrow and disappointment. Just when you think things can't get any worse for her, they do! But, her Faith, her family and her perseverance pulled her through! As a mother of four myself, I can't imagine dealing with everything she had to deal with. I have so much respect for how she lived her life with a positive attitude and determination, when others would have given up. Mary's mother played an important role in her life and helped to make Mary the strong woman she is today. And Mary, herself, also has impacted her own children's lives--a legacy that I'm sure will continue on for generations to come. I feel I know her and I will make an exception and read my first novel--a Mary Higgins Clark one!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
great book. i can relate to a lot of the things you went through as a child brought up in an Irish Catholic family.What a wonderful exercise in love. Your book was great and I can't wait for your next book. You signed a book I have and I will treasure it forever. You are my favorite writer. I just wish you could write a book a month. I think I have every book you have ever written. Keep up the good work. I am retired and look forward to your new books. Thank you so vey much.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished the audiobook and really enjoyed it, especially because of it being read by Mary herself. I have read a number of her books and after reading Marys story it will bring a new light to her books
Guest More than 1 year ago
i can usually count on this author for an enjoyable read...usually quick and painless, nothing that stretches you too much...just an easy read. Kitchen Privileges missed the mark. Higgins-Clark is a great author but her memoir is a snore! sorry!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am astonished at how pallid, uninspired, even poorly written this book is. Miss Clark¿s life may be interesting to her and interesting, perhaps, because she became a famous author, but in actuality it is no more interesting than the most ordinary life. It could be yours or mine. As surprised as I am by the lackluster content of the book, I am even more surprised by the lackluster quality of the writing. ¿Rare as hen¿s teeth¿ and ¿We took to marriage like ducks to water¿ are clichés no professional writer should allow herself. They abound. Miss Clark even used the pronoun ¿I¿ instead of ¿we,¿ a surprising error. I enjoy memoirs and especially memoirs by writers, but this one is unmemorable. Read, instead, Eudora Welty¿s One Writer¿s Beginnings. Now there is a memoir.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Does any reader have to be told who Mary Higgins Clark is? I think not. But, now with this remarkably candid and affecting memoir the author of 27 bestselling novels tells her personal story. Not only that, this recollection is related in her own voice, making it all the more meaningful. Rather than through a fictional protagonist she speaks directly to us with words of encouragement and hope. Beginning with a childhood in the Bronx during the Depression Ms. Clark had dreams - she dreamed of becoming a writer, and her mother encouraged her even though the older woman struggled to make ends meet by renting out rooms. A sign was placed by the front door reading, "Furnished Rooms. Kitchen Privileges." Ms. Clark's days as a student at an exclusive girl's school came to an end; she lost an older brother whom she deeply loved during World War II. She tells with affection and sensitivity of her marriage to Warren Clark, and the birth of their children. A devastating blow occurred when he died unexpectedly leaving her widowed with five young children. Nonetheless, she soldiered on, writing at a kitchen table. For her labors? Forty rejections. Determined to reach her goal and support her family she wrote radio scripts and began work on a novel. The rest is literary history. Ms. Clark generously shares her life experiences, reminding us that dreams can come true when someone is willing to persist and fight mightily for them.