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A Long Way Down (Movie Tie-In)
     

A Long Way Down (Movie Tie-In)

3.7 88
by Nick Hornby
 

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A wise, affecting novel from the beloved, award-winning author of Funny Girl, High Fidelity, and About A Boy.

New York Times-bestselling author Nick Hornby mines the hearts and psyches of four lost souls who connect just when they've reached the end of the line. A Long Way Down is now a major motion picture from Magnolia

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Long Way Down 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 88 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ok...I waited a long time for this book, and i was somewhat dissappointed. Don't get me wrong, Nick Hornby is a great author, i love all his other books, but this one wasn't what i thought it would be.It started out great but....it kind of lingered down at the end. Maybe my expectations were high when i was reading it, of course it had some pretty funny but dark moments, but i would not recommend this book for newcomers to Nick Hornby.
hutchers More than 1 year ago
I have seen Hornby's movies and have thoroughly enjoyed them so I thought I would try one of his Novels. Sadly, I was disappointed. I, at first, was entertained by the odd nature of the characters and the plot, but quickly became bored and annoyed with both. I think his attempts to be original were successful and his diction was easy to read but as the story itself progressed I began to resent the book. He may have achieved a well worded book, but the actual plot and story were unreliable and somewhat boring. There were positive parts to the book, Hornby's use of humor and allusions to pop culture helped move the book along and he easily portrayed selfish and flawed characters, but I was unable to find a connection, relate to or even like any of these characters. I was hoping for a meaningful ending, perhaps even an epiphany for the characters, but once again I found myself disappointed. For me, even though they may have suffered slight change the characters were stagnant. I saw little change in this novel and I think despite his efforts to create a realistic and relatable work, Hornby fell flat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought the book would be more riveting. Hoping the movie is better...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not as good as his other works. Didn't pull me in as I hoped it would have.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Four strangers meet up at midnight on New Year's Eve at the top of Topper's House, a 15-story apartment complex in North London. They all have their reasons, some more unlikely than others. The most interesting one is Martin, a host for morning television who was jailed and gossiped by the tabloids for sleeping with a 15-year-old. Maureen is a middle-aged mother of a disabled adult son. Jess is the daughter of a government official, depressed over a breakup with her boyfriend. Then, there's JJ. JJ is American. He delivers pizza for a living but he reads books. A Long Way Down is told simultaneously by all four characters while still moving the story along. The true-to-life dialogue makes the story more exciting. It takes this band of people an hour just to get off of Topper's House but after a short interlude to Shoreditch for the quartet to chase down Jess' beleaguered boyfriend, they make a pact to do not do anything harmful for six weeks. In a very funny twist, the press gets wind of the whole suicide thing and suddenly they're all faced with headlines like 'Martin Sharp and Junior Minister's Daughter In Suicide Pact.' Now they're faced not only with their own midnight thoughts but a shouting mob of aggressively invasive journalists and photographers. Hiding out in Starbuck's, they form a book club and vowed to only read writers that have committed suicide. They manage to get it together long enough to take a trip to the Canary Islands that ends in a disaster. They also finally get to see someone take the long way down from Topper's House.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its different and its good if you have ever had thoughts or been close to someone who has had thoughts about suicide.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
hilarious piece of work. this is the first book i actually remember reading because how funny it is
Guest More than 1 year ago
Starts out well, but seems to lose steam about halfway through. I admit I didn't finish it, so maybe it ended with a bang. I listened to the audio, which was fun, because there were three different readers. Can't say I really recommend this one, though.
Chrissy_W More than 1 year ago
Did I enjoy this book: There’s got to be at least one character in a book that I care about. I was slogging through a modern classic–I won’t name it here–with the least likable set of characters I’d ever encountered. I pushed through to the halfway mark, and then I said, “Why am I doing this? I’m going to find a novel whose people touch my heart.” I was lucky enough to pick up Nick Hornby’s A Long Way Down. I really enjoyed the book. The cover of my copy of A Long Way Down shows four pairs of shoes hovering over a blue sky. The wing tips are fallen talk show host Martin’s. The comfortable oxfords are 51-year-old Maureen’s. Teenaged smart-mouth Jess owns the black Keds (and the red socks), and the boots belong to rock star wannabe JJ. These four unlikely compatriots meet atop Topper’s Tower in London one New Year’s Eve. Each climbs to the roof alone, intending to jump and end a life that no longer has meaning. They come down in a pack, on a mission to find Jess’s erstwhile boyfriend. Then, mission accomplished, they find they can neither break their connection nor complete their original mission. The book is told in all four voices, so we get inside each of their heads–miserable screw-up Martin, who had it all and lost it via his own stupidity; self-effacing Maureen, whose life has been spent caring for a son so disabled he has no awareness; the jilted Jess, whose sister is missing–a probable suicide; and musician JJ, who lost his band, his love, and his will to live. This band of misfits screws up regularly and sometimes spectacularly. They’re drifty and lunatic, self-centered and clueless, and yet–I care about each one. Would I recommend it: I recommend A Long Way Down if you want a funny book with likable characters that admits to hope. Don’t look for saccharine, though–true love doesn’t come waltzing through the door, nor do the foolish become wise with the flash of a Hogwarts’ wand. But people on the wrong course do manage, with determination and an odd kind of courage, to turn their baggage-heavy ships. They get by,–yes, they do,–with a little help from their odd cast of friends. As reviewed by Pam at Every Free Chance Books.
lildirtydesigner More than 1 year ago
Meh! If life gives you lemons, you make lemonade? In this case, Nick Hornby should have added vodka and mix up this slow read into something a little more believable than mediocre. Well I am a bit disappointed in this book and the only redeeming factor is the character Maureen. JJ was my second favorite and Jess and Martin are totally pointless. How can I review this book other than just to say wait for the movie (hopefully the movie will be better). Four strangers/individuals meet up on top of a fifteen-story building on New Year's Eve to end their lives, what happens next is an unlikely friendship of these four people on what happens when you don't die. Each character has reasons on why they want to die and why their lives are at the end of their rope. And each of them received a lifeline of each other. This book has good moments and at the end you want to believe that life isn't as bad as it is. Yes, there are some bad times in life but reach out to someone/anyone and you will see that life isn't as bad as it looks. I didn't need to read that to understand that life goes on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Too mant commas. I had a very hard time finishing this book. Not because of the story the writing was hard ti follow. Hope he movie is better.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
KatrinaO More than 1 year ago
Four people found themselves commonly attempting to commit suicide on the same roof and then shifted to finding valuable friendship with each other instead. Stories of loss, depression and frustration of each of them and the unexpected cure from the bond of friendship were narrated.  Let second chances be an option. :)
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Thorne2112 More than 1 year ago
Although it's not as good as About a Boy or High Fidelity, A Long Way Down is at least better than How To Be Good. Here Nick Hornby presents a story about people who just aren't quite ready to commit suicide, especially among each other.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite books by my favorite author. Hornby's writing style is like a witty commentary on day to day life, but in this particular work he really shines.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A thought provoking book, and even though I read it years ago, I have it on my wishlist to read again!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago