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Lost Antarctica: Adventures in a Disappearing Land
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Lost Antarctica: Adventures in a Disappearing Land

5.0 2
by James McClintock
 

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The bitter cold and three months a year without sunlight make Antarctica virtually uninhabitable for humans. Yet a world of extraordinary wildlife persists in these harsh conditions, including leopard seals, giant squid, 50-foot algae, sea spiders, coral, multicolored sea stars, and giant predatory worms. Now, as temperatures rise, this fragile ecosystem is under

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Lost Antarctica: Adventures in a Disappearing Land 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved this book. Learned a lot of new things without even realizing it as the author has an approachable and humorous. I'd say it made me want to go to Antarctica but I think it'd be better for Antarctica if eco-tourists keep their distance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book immensely. McClintock has combined aspects of science, adventure, and humor into a descriptive narrative that makes it hard to put this book down. The author is a research scientist who has spent many seasons in Antarctica. He details evidence of climate change he has witnessed over the years. His examples helped me understand the impact climate change could have for the entire planet. This is a very readable book filled with colorful and fascinating details. The author made me feel as if I was there with him diving under six-feet of sea ice in the clear, subfreezing Antarctic waters. Below, he describes a lush world, filled with some of the most uniquely adapted and vulnerable animals and plants on earth. I felt like I was tagging along as the author witnesses an increasing number of thunderous crashes of ice breaking off glaciers, or as he visits penguin rookeries where climate change is affecting generations of penguins. This is a good book for the armchair traveler, the person fascinated by science, those interested in learning more about global climate change, or anyone who enjoys a well written book.