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Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell
     

Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell

5.0 2
by Andy Lester
 

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Following the common-sense O'Reilly style, Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell cuts through the chaff and gives you practical details you can use every day. Everything you need to know about the Unix side of Mac OS X has been systematically documented in this book.

Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell offers a complete overview of Mac OS X Tiger (Version 10.4),

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Mac OS X Tiger in a Nutshell 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
That is amasome : )
Guest More than 1 year ago
Are you a Unix- user or programmer or a system administrator? If you are, then this book is for you! Authors Andy Lester, Chris Stone, Chuck Toporek and Jason McIntosh, have done an outstanding job of writing a book that cuts through the chaff and gives you practical details you can use every day. Lester, Stone, Toporek and McIntosh, begin by providing you with a quick introduction to the Unix side of Mac OS X. Then, the authors list descriptions and usage terms for over 300 of the Unix commands found in Mac OS X. They continue by introducing you to the Terminal application and show you how to issue commands and tweak its settings. Next, the authors provide a quick overview of the differences between bash, Mac OS X Panther's default shell, and tcsh, the default shell for earlier versions of Mac OS X. Then, they provide a quick overview of the bash shell, along with a listing of its built-in commands for shell scripting. They also cover pattern matching. Next, the authors cover some of vi's most commonly used options and features. Then, they focus on Emacs editing capabilities. The authors continue by touring the various folders found on a typical Mac OS X volume, including the Unix-centric directories that the Finder usually keeps out of sight. They then detail the way Mac OS X stores and accesses its administrative information, ranging from the NetInfo system of network-linked databases to the 'old-school' file-based system familiar to Unix administrators. The authors also detail the major categories of services Unix supplies, including web servers, file sharing, and mail servers. Next, they highlight some of the key features of Apple's X11 distribution and explain how to install Apple's X11 and the X11 SDK. Finally, the authors describe how to gain access to and hack these settings via the Terminal application and the defaults command. Everything you need to know about the Unix side of Mac OS X has been systematically documented in this most excellent book. This book is the most comprehensive quick reference on the market and is a must for any serious Mac user.