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Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood
     

Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood

4.7 15
by Ellen F. Brown, John Wiley Jr.
 

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Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind: A Bestseller's Odyssey from Atlanta to Hollywood presents the first comprehensive overview of how this iconic novel became an international phenomenon that has managed to sustain the public's interest for seventy-five years. Various Mitchell biographies and several compilations of her letters tell part of the story, but,

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Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you love Gone With The Wind, the book and/or the movie, you will really enjoy reading this. It's a real eye opener about what Margaret Mitchell went through to finish this great novel and all that came afterward. Who knew? Very good book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I couldn't put the nook down! I was always a casual GWTW fan, but this gave me a new understanding and love for it. Beautifully written, this account brings the GWTW journey to life. I applaud the citation and use of so many sources in a way that tells a dynamic story of what could easily just have been a monotone history lesson. I highly recommend this to anyone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So much happens in this book and it keeps you engaged the whole time. It was incredible!
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English_Lit_lover More than 1 year ago
I met one of the author's tonight at public library presentation and 75th anniversary of GWTW. Wiley presented with his dynamic historical context from which he drew most of the research for his book. I truly enjoyed reading it and recommend this for any GWTW fan!
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Bookhobbit More than 1 year ago
My grandmother stood on Peachtree Street during the premier of Gone With the Wind and swore she could have reached out and touched Clark Gable. She introduced me to the novel and movie at a young age, and I've reread it, re-watched it, and treasured it ever since. I was thrilled to see that a new book on this Southern icon was available, and I eagerly read it. Even though I have read a good deal about the book, movie, and Margaret Mitchell, I learned some things from this book that I did not know. I found Brown and Wiley's efforts outstanding, especially when it came to sharing little-known information. For instance, I never knew the role that Lois Cole played in the discovery of the novel. The information on the foreign copyrights and Mitchell's efforts on behalf of other American writers was quite interesting. This book also brings the entire saga, including Ripley's sequel and stage productions, up-to-date; the authors don't simply end the book with Mitchell's death, as so many other works do. If you are a GWTW fan and want to know more about this wonderful book, then this is a book that needs to be a part of your collection.
RPEwing More than 1 year ago
I am not a hardcore GWTW fan, nor a lover of biographies or history for that matter. That being said, Bestseller's Odyssey was a great read and I thoroughly enjoyed learning about the life and times of Margaret Mitchell's great work. I received an advance copy of Bestseller's Odyssey with few preconceptions and so was not surprised to discover how little I understood of the publishing industry. What I was not expecting was to be so intrigued by the nature and number of legal hurdles which Mitchell and her work overcame. Extending far beyond its initial print publication, this book details all those who shaped the ultimate path of Gone with the Wind. Despite my original ambivalence (apologies all) towards GWTW, I found myself rooting for Mitchell as she struggled to protect her work and maintain her principled stance. My appreciation for Mitchell deepened reading how she overcame each successive challenge as she shepherded the book along its way. I chuckled reading the frequent excerpts from Mitchell's genteel yet fierce correspondence. The depth and breadth of this book was impressive and left me rueful for simpler, more civil times.