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The Mayor of Lexington Avenue
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The Mayor of Lexington Avenue

3.9 24
by James Sheehan
 

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Jack Tobin is a trial lawyer with a searing-hot reputation in Miami, far removed from his scrappy youth on the streets of New York.

But when a young man, Rudy, is railroaded into a murder conviction in the tiny Florida backwater of Bass Creek, Tobin resolves to pay back a debt to his best friend, the boy who once dubbed him 'the Mayor of Lexington

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Mayor of Lexington Avenue 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One reviewer who gave this novel a high rating questioned why someone else only gave it one star. I found it neither a compelling read nor something to toss out. The story certainly started out on a strong note, introducing the victim, the killer, and the person who would be blamed right from the get go. From there forward I thought the story would be about a down-to-the-wire but just-in-time save of poor Rudy Kelly from death row. Of course, it wasn't, and that's what made it a different kind of story. (Hence my 4-star rating for originality). The novel became uneven, however, when Jack as an adult enters the plot. Too much of the dialogue didn't sound right, and many of the characters became uneven in their behaviors. For example, Rudy Kelly--who was described throughout the story as borderline retarded--suddenly became unusually profound in his comments. I also found too many of the characters to be one-dimensional (clear good guys and bad guys in this story folks) And the various romantic relationships that suddenly developed were described too much like an 8th-grader telling about them. Where the story was strong, however, was in ending with a sense of justice being served while still leaving you understanding that good guys (like Rudy and Nancy) don't always win.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I see that one of the reviewers on this page could only award this book one star. Why? I wonder. I bought the book and was gripped by the story from the get-go. James Sheehan's style, the feeling he could get across about the principal characters, and the story-line is beautifully crafted. John Grisham's 'The Innocent Man' touches on the same subject, miscarriage of justice but James Sheehan's story carries the same powerful message that justice must be done and also seen to be done. Splendid book. I look forward to another book from this masterly pen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel was the ultimate joy to read. Well written, great story line and characterizations. Highly recommended to all.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1986 Bass Creek, Florida, Geronimo Cruz is drinking when he sees someone leave the trailer of Lucy Ochoa. He enters her abode to ask her who the youngster is, but she insists he was only the drunken kid from the convenience store who stayed a few minutes. Geronimo thinks he never expected the loose woman to remain faithful, but lying is unacceptable. He slits her throat. --- Police Detective Sergeant Wesley Brume hones in on bi-racially Rudy Kelly as the prime suspect Rudy worries because he had sex with Lucy just before she died. His mother hires lawyer Tracey James, who initially handles the case but drops it when her client can no longer pay her fee. The Cobb County public defender provides a poor defense while the prosecutor Clay Evans and Wes doctor ¿evidence¿ to insure that Rudy is convicted of first-degree murder. A decade later with Rudy¿s execution coming soon, trial lawyer Jack Tobin learns of the case and decides to take it on pro bono, but no one wants to admit that they framed Rudy and much of the trial evidence and related documents is officially ¿unavailable¿ in a timely manner. --- THE MAYOR OF LEXINGTON AVENUE is a terrific legal thriller that will grip readers with its strong condemnation of the American capital punishment system. The story line is action-packed though flashbacks to 1950s-1960s New York slow down the pace yet provides the personal impetus for Jack to take on the case. The cast consists of multi dimensional people but the star is the abuse of power by the state in death row cases. Unless you¿re the state electrician, sub-genre fans will appreciate this deep cautionary thriller. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book. For everything there is a season. For everything there is a reason. Do not read the long reviews. To much info. Just read the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished reading the mayor of lexington avenue.As good as grisham , my all time favourite author.Kept me up all night. Am glad to learn that his next release comes out in march.I will be a first day buyer of same.Read the 2 other reviews.Can only tell reviewer who did not like the book to realise how many interesting ideas of how to win a case were presented.We all procrastinate about some things especially of friends from our childhood.Reading this book made me think about a lot of things. If the author can make me think, he deserves my patronage.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read an advanced copy of this book not expecting to finish--I ended up not being able to put it down. I would recommend to anyone. Looking forward to reading more of James Sheehan in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read a lot of great reviews on James Sheehan, a Tampa resident. This book had a great premise, but the writing, especially the dialogue, was very rote and stilted. I am not sure if it is the order of the story told, the cursory description of various covered up killings, but the story lacked an emotional connection for me. Narrative was simple. Quick read. Don't let anyone tell you it is comparable to John Grisham. It is not.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was ok, and well written, but I read Blood and Ashes first and preferred it much more to this. Light read, good bedtime book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
After the first 25 pages i almost put the book down in disgust. I thought the rest of the book was going to be a long drawn out trial wirh lots of misrepresentation but that is not where the author went with it and it turned out to be a good book. I am still for the death penalty...don't throw the baby out with the bath water...but we definitely have some work to do on the judicial system. The court rulings in the story stretch plausability at times which is where the real issue is, if they in anyway represent what would happen in the 'real' world. Still, a good story and one i enjoyed to the end. Glad i didn't give up after the first 25 pages.
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Get a life all res. Yuppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppplfy
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are 'blurbs' on the front and back of this book extolling it as one of the best legal thrillers ever written, penned by a first-time author who writes like an old pro. I don't know what book they were reading, because it sure wasn't 'The Mayor of Lexington Avenue'. This is truly one of the most poorly written books I have ever read. The author telegraphs every piece of dialogue. The characters were poorly drawn and not interesting at all. And they are incosistent in their positions. On one page, a character is reluctant to do something and by the next page he acquiesces. The courtroom scenes lack any sort of tension. You can see the plot points coming a mile away. The 'flashback' scenes lacked any compelling emotion and you can't really care about the character of 'Mikey' because he is not fleshed out. But my main complaint is that it is horribly written. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that the author published it himself because I can't imagine a decent publishing house accepting this piece of dreck.