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Mr. Peanut
     

Mr. Peanut

3.4 89
by Adam Ross
 

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A New York Times Noteable Book

Mesmerizing, exhilarating, and profoundly moving, Mr. Peanut is a police procedural of the soul, a poignant investigation of the relentlessly mysterious human heart.

David Pepin has been in love with his wife, Alice, since the moment they met in a university seminar on Alfred Hitchcock. After thirteen years of

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Mr. Peanut 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 87 reviews.
Markai More than 1 year ago
I was intrigued by all the buzz -- especially because some raved about it and others didn't seem to get it -- and I'm definitely with those who love it. In fact, I think it's a book some people just won't get because it's so rich and complex. Is it a thriller, or a meditation on love and marriage, or a brilliantly structured literary work? It's all those things. Wow, it left my head spinning and wanting to go back and read it all over again, which is what the best books do. Highest recommendation!!
harstan More than 1 year ago
Alice Pepin dies with a peanut stuck in her throat. Her distraught computer game developer husband of thirteen years David claims she knew she was allergic to peanuts which caused an anaphylactic shock reaction and believes the depression sufferer committed suicide. Detectives Sheppard and Hastroll agree the husband is guilty of murder. They plan to prove it starting with a good cop bad cop interrogation of David; his first words to them are he did not kill her. However, what hits home to Ward and Sam, the cops on the case, is how much David's relationship with his late wife parallels their respective relationships with their still living wives. This is a strange well written disturbing police procedural that uses death to look clearly at three "loving" couples through mostly the lenses of the males frustrated with their partners. Character driven, readers will wonder whether David killed Alice and whether the cops sympathized with him sort of like the courtroom scene in How To Murder Your Wife in which viewers wonder whether the juror will press the imaginary button or not. Fans who relish something refreshingly different in their suspense reading will appreciate the unique Mr. Peanut. Harriet Klausner
buffalobibliophile More than 1 year ago
First of all, do you know what a Mobius strip is? Thought not. You will need a dictionary and access to Wikipedia before you start Adam Ross' debut novel, Mr. Peanut, and even then you may scratch your head a number of times before you get to the last page. But please do persevere, for this is one cracker jack of a novel that is oh so entertaining. Filled with puzzles, dreams that cry for interpretation, quirky characters (one named, cleverly enough, Mr. Mobius) it's a psychological mystery that reaches into the past and thrusts you forward into the future before dropping you, gasping for air, on the doorstep of the conclusion. Solve the puzzle and you will breathe a sigh of complete satisfaction. Not for the faint- hearted or the easily offended, the book includes a novel within a novel, passages filled with sex-fueled antics, an exploration of the hidden meanings in Alfred Hitchcock films, a case for the plight of the obese, an investigation of a murder that took place over sixty years ago and, most importantly, asks the question that faces many married couples, "Can marriage save your life, or is it just the beginning of a long double homicide?" (Page 309) Within the first ten pages of the novel, Alice Pepin's obesity, insecurity and depression have culminated in her death from anaphylactic shock from the ingestion of a peanut at her kitchen table. Her husband, David, is the prime suspect in her murder. From here on, this brainteaser on steroids drags you through the maze of possibilities, moving forward, then backtracking, then looking behind door number two, then trying to twist the Rubric's cube another way, well, you get the idea. But as the book progresses, you realize that the novel is a book about three marriages and the predominant theme is, 'Can a married couple change?' The struggles that the three married couples confront force you to compare, contrast and define what your personal picture of marriage is. But it's all done with smoke and mirrors, and with abundant metaphors and symbolism and dark, dark humor. This book will not be for everyone, but if you choose to climb aboard the rollercoaster, you're in for quite a ride. Rated R. Highly recommended.
Lynie More than 1 year ago
David Pepin is a partner in a computer game software company. His life is as intricate as the M.C. Escher art that he loves. Married to Alice in a true love/hate relationship, he fantasizes about her demise. He's also writing a book about the murder of Alice Pepin. While the idea is a good one, the murky transition between the actual story and the one the character is writing is very difficult to follow. As indicated by the title, Alice succumbs to a deadly allergic reaction to peanuts she has ingested. The question is, was it suicide or murder? As the detectives try to prove David's guilt we learn about their very troubled lives as well. The most distressing aspect of this book is the passive-aggressive behavior on the part of the female characters. None of the characters in MR. PEANUT actually like their respective spouses or communicate with them and they are filled with hate and despair on a daily basis. In fact I have to say that there is not a single redeeming protagonist in the book. I found the parallel universe presented in MR. PEANUT to be both confusing and depressing. You might want to skip this one. Lynn Kimmerle
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Kiss me infront of meh gf why?
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Veronica Rodriguez More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was good if you enjoy this type but if you are "sensitive" as so many claim then its not for you. All in all good.
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Versel More than 1 year ago
Oh dear Lord, I give up. I tried, really I tried. I waded through 3/4 of this piece of crap before I finally gave up. There is no real plot, there is no real structure. This horrible waste of paper and cyberspace (in case you get it on ereader or MP3) fluctuates between a travelogue (what would you like to know about Hawaii, it took up a massive amount of time) to soft core porn and, somewhere, a mystery that may or may not be murder is lost. There are multiple unhappy marriages, people who need to invest in therapy, and a midget. There is also quite a few hours of my life I wish I could get back. I have no idea if there was a murder because 3/4 into an almost 500 page book, it still wasn't clear. I don't know if they all died and I don't care. Read the back of a can of Planters nuts--it will make more sense.
Barbara Pinkston More than 1 year ago
Terrible story!
sstephanieshaw More than 1 year ago
This was one of the strangest books I have read in a long time. I felt as though the author took bits & pieces from several novels & wove a web of confusion.
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