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Namath: A Biography
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Namath: A Biography

3.7 4
by Mark Kriegel
 

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In between Babe Ruth and Michael Jordan there was Joe Namath, one of the  few sports heroes to transcend the game he played. Novelist and former sports-columnist Mark Kriegel’s bestselling biography of the iconic quarterback details his journey from steel-town pool halls to the upper reaches of American celebrity—and beyond. The first of his kind,

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Namath 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This Biography was basically the story of how the famous Joe Namath came about.Just because of one radio mix-up he has been called an alcoholic,pervert, and a junky.However if you read this book you will find that he his much more than that. That he is an intelligent and caring man with a great story. He is just a man who loves football with all of his heart. Unlike many others, I enjoyed the detail into his family background that was given by Kriegel. It showed how his family life was which I found very interesting.One thing I didn't like is how little depth they covered about his trade from the Jets and how many different emotions were being tossed around. The major themes from Namath's life story is to never give up on your dreams, no matter what other people think or tell you.For example, In the 1969 Superbowl everyone told Namath that there was no way he could beat the Baltimore Colts. But look who has a superbowl ring. The book related to me because not only did his grandparents come straight from a european country, but he is and is apart of my favorite football team of all time.
bneumann72 More than 1 year ago
This book was a biography of Joe Namath. It was good in most ways but I felt that it went too far into background information, for example it told of how his grandfather came to America for the first two chapters. It follows Namath from his birth all the way until the book was written. One of the better aspects of the book was how well is personified Joe and showed his true character. Many believed him to just be an alcoholic party boy, which he was, but he had a much better side to him. Through reading this book, I learned about the life of Joe Namath, an interesting football player and person.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was good it was in depth with a full discription into namtahs life i would recomend this book to anyone who wants to know about joe namath it had full color pictures and full report on season in football i liked this book this book is good and not many pages either
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is with great sense of irony that I read this biography. Growing up with a football-mad father and high school-star-quarterback brothers, I was able to make the leap between the sport and the near-spiritual devotion it inspires. As a school girl during Super Bowl III, I was crazy about the New York Jets, much to the dismay of my father and brothers, who seemed to think that football is something akin to the military and should be reconized as such. I understood early on that football players need not necessarily be dumb; they game they play is complex. And indeed, if Joe Namath is any example, so are those who play it. His brash, scotch-and-sex-fueled public persona is contrasted with a deeply-held Catholic faith; his love for his family proved to be the stabililizer that drew him back from the edge more than once. Through the writer's eyes, Joe Namath is at turns a man to be admired, disliked, envied and pitied. He is fully human, complete with the ying/yang union of boldness and strength, surfacing out insecurity and fear. For those who have any memory of Joe Namath, this is an thorougly insightful look at the country's first fully-marketed sports peronality, a brand to be sold and resold to a never ending line of bidders. What's more, no punches are pulled. Despite his inability to interview Namath himself, the author has been able to access information that allowed him to create a well-developed look at a complicated, loveable American sports hero -- a true reflection of the enigmatic country his father came to as a young man. It is worth the time.