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Neuromancer
     

Neuromancer

4.2 369
by William Gibson
 

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SPECIAL 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION—THE MOST IMPORTANT AND INFLUENTIAL SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL OF THE PAST TWO DECADES

Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. The winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer didn't just

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Neuromancer 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 369 reviews.
wbshreves More than 1 year ago
Neuromancer should be on the top of any Sci-fi fans must read list. What can you say about a book that launched an entire sub-genre of literature? With a breakthrough image of the future that we become a little closer to each day, William Gibson has inspired his fellow authors, futurists, and tech guru's since the day it was published. How many other works of art have reached a level of influence that in spawns a whole world with its own spinoffs in the works of Shadowrun? Read it. If you have ever dreamed of the future, wanted to see the internet you surf, or use technology to make yourself a better YOU Neuromancer contains all of that and more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First off, I have to say that I was introduced to this novel by seeing, loving and researching The Matrix. I believe that the movie was just absolutely fantastic and amazing and any other adjective that I can think of (Just not at the moment). So, I picked up this book from the library to see what it was all about.
It was pretty good basically sums it up. It had innovative settings and ideas and was generally awesome all around, but I just didn't like how sometimes certain technologies were never explained or were only barely mentioned. That's fine if it is just mentioned in passing, but when you linger on them and detail them without saying what they actually do, that kind of frustrated me.
Other than that, this book was what I like to call perfect. Everything about it was expertly crafted and written, and I highly recommend it to people interested in cyperbunk or just basic science fiction. I will be getting a copy for my own library.
Kilroy6644 More than 1 year ago
For years I'd heard about what a great book this is, and how it was one of the defining novels of cyberpunk. Unfortunately, I was not interested in cyberpunk, or Neuromancer. Recently, however, my attitude changed, and decided to pick it up. I'm sorry I waited so long. Neuromancer is, almost 30 years after it was published, still refreshingly original. Having read it, I can see the influence it's had on other books and movies, yet it feels different from all of its "offspring." Now that I've finished it, what began as a passing interest, "to see what it's all about," has grown into a deep fascination, and I'm looking forward to picking up more of Gibson's books.
JesseJ07 More than 1 year ago
Neuromancer is by no means a long novel, it is under 400 pages composed of many short chapters; this does not mean it is anything like an "easy read." Gibson consistently uses words that laymen, or persons-not-from-the-future, will not know in context. Reading this book today the reader most likely feels as if he's missed some crucial background info, possibly a predecessor to the novel that he didn't know existed, but that is not the case with Neuromancer. Throughout the book Gibson weaves his tale while not divulging every detail or aspect about it. By giving the reader a very narrow realistic view, through the eyes of the protagonist, and using technical jargon not invented yet the reader is almost coerced to put himself into the story and try to unravel what is taking place. All of this can make for a confusing read to many readers- and the brilliance of Gibson's work can easily be overlooked. I cannot recommend this book for everyone or even avid fans of science fiction. I can only say that I view it as an important book in the history of the science fiction genre and look at it as progenitor to other great masterpieces such as Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson. The story of Neuromancer is exciting but difficult to follow if it fails to grab your attention thoroughly. It won't be uncommon to get confused by the plot while reading Neuromancer but as long as you're attentive and keep reading any conflict should resolve itself as the story unfolds. If you're a science fiction fan looking for a challenging read and interested in a classic then you should pick up Neuromancer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While at times i had to stop and read a paragraph or two over, it was still an understandable and entertaining book. I would definitely recommend to a sci-fi fan, but i think any of the newer generations can appreciate it
Janus More than 1 year ago
The most important thing to keep in mind when reading 'Neuromancer' is that it was the first to do what it does. Before there was the Matrix trilogy, before iPods and 3D broadcasting home televisions, there was 'Neuromancer'. Written at the same time the very first home PC was released, Gibson envisioned a vast network of connected information called 'cyberspace'. People who sought to break into the databases of others would use their technical skills to link up with the Matrix and and break through layers of ICE to steal information. So basically, Gibson envisioned the internet as we know it, hackers and firewalls. The writing itself is actually pretty confusing. This is also the book that created the genre of cyber-punk, so it is very technically laden and can be mind boggling at times. The story itself is pretty interesting about an AI that seeks autonomy. The characters aren't all that original, in fact almost all of them feel like stereotypical mid 80's action film characters. Perhaps with the exception of the psychotic Riviera. I chose to read 'Neuromancer' because of all the reviews that referred to it as a mind bender. To that I must disagree. I will say that one chapter is VERY mind bending, but the rest, not so much; pretty straight forward actually. But that also may be me viewing the story through the lens of someone who has lived with things like the internet for most of my life. Either way, it is still a good book and an easy read for the most part.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This one's a classic for a reason. This is the book that spawned Cyberpunk, and includes the seeds of ideas that would give us Bladerunner (Do Androids Dream), and eventually The Matrix. So revolutionary that things I've loved have been cribbing off it for years without my knowledge. Good to finally be able to give credit where it's due! This one's a must read, whether you're in it for the detective story, the action, or the cybernetic enhancements. Great stuff.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'll make this short. The books characters and ideas were more than a bit strange to begin with but had enough substance to hook me into reading it. However, by he time I had gotten halfway through it I had lost all interest in the book. It didn't really seem to have a point and if it had a point it had a very obtuse way of making it. Also the characters had gotten more and more weird and less and less interesting. At that point I stopped reading it which I do with maybe 5-10% of any book I start to read. Watching the grass grow would probably be more interesting than reading this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No doubt some will proclaim that Gibson's choppy, stuttering prose is meant to reflect the setting of this dark story. Intentional or not, it makes for a decidedly unpleasant read. The uneven pacing and drug addled perspective of the POV character makes for a fairly boring read. I found myself unimpressed with the setting (scene setting is quite sparse.) and uninterested in the characters. I would only recommend this novel for hardened fans of the cyberpunk sub-genre. Go for Richard Morgan's Thirteen for a better written novel in a similiar setting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am not sure why this was called a new trend setter back in it's day. Those of you over 60 will recognize the writing style as Micky Spillanes in his "Mike Hammer" series.......with profanity, sex. and sci-fi trappings. If it were music it would be Bill Haley and the Comets VS Brian Eno.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately, cyberpunk is not a very good genre. Most cyberpunk authors generally rehash whatever Philip K Dick book they like the most, and Gibson is no exception. The characters are tired-they're cardboard cutouts-as are the AI machines that the characters encounter. This book has its excellent parts, but the basic idea of plugging one's brain into a computer directly is not explored very well, so thinking readers would be better off watching The Matrix. Neuromancer is not a bad book, and it's certainly unique, but it does not stand up to earlier works of science fiction and its main ideas have been explored more fully in The Matrix and modern Anime.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow. Just wow.
ABookAWeekES More than 1 year ago
As a lifelong reader, I've always strived to sample a variety of genres. When I was presented with the opportunity to join a sci-fi and fantasy book club (both genres that I normally do not read), I jumped at the chance. Our first read, Neuromancer by William Gibson seemed like a perfect jumping off point. The novel takes place somewhere in the not too distant future. The protagonist, Case, is an ex hacker/thief whose past escapades have left him physically and mentally damaged. During his last big heist, his enemies destroyed his nervous system, leaving him unable to tap into cyberspace. Without the capacity to carry out his crimes, he spends his days abusing drugs and searching for an end to his miserable life. All of that changes when a group of criminals recruits him for one large heist. They agree to cure his physical maladies in exchange for his expert services. If all of this seems a bit too good to be true, that's because it is. As Case begins to work with the group, he discovers that they are taking on an artificial intelligence that has the potential to destroy the world. Even worse, Armitage, the leader of the criminal group, injected a slow release poison into Case during his nervous system recovery. Now Case is at the mercy of this mysterious organization as he tries to complete the most difficult and dangerous job of his life. This novel is best viewed within the context of its publication. Technology of 1984 was very different from our tech filled lives of today. With that in mind, the world that Gibson imagines is brilliantly drawn and eerily predictive of things to come. He coins the word "cyberspace" and gives life to an imaginative future that inspired works for years to come. In fact, it is probably because this novel was so influential on future works that it seems less groundbreaking than it actually is. Our popular culture has become saturated in futuristic tales, many of which stem from Gibson's work, so it is harder to appreciate the originality of this novel. The story slowly unfolds with the plot revealing bits and pieces of itself as the pages turn. I found this style of narrative a bit difficult to follow and to engage in. Still, I can certainly appreciate the influential elements of this novel and am happy to have read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best books I have ever read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A must read science fiction classic. Well written, crisp, and imaginative.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first 40 pages made no sense and I stopped.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cool as Hosaka Ice, sharp like a razorgirl, Straylight dangerous. Everything you love comes from this.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
That this is a seminal work of cyberpunk is a well attested fact but it is not a perfect book. Some complain that the words are obtuse but I found it easy to keep up with Gibson's prattling jargon as it was the beat of the novel that propelled the story. What's more difficult was his lack of clarity; there are passages that are just not well written and require one to go over them a few times to find out what's going on. He varies wildly with his writing quality. It helps to think of this genre also as tech-noir, for it came from those old black and white movies full of booze and cigarette smoke and dames with a shady past chased by thugs all moved into the near future world of computers and multi-national corporations. It's the stuff that dreams are made of recast for a new generation. It is a book worth reading and has some good spots; too bad that this was Gibson's high point and that the stuff I've read since then does not match it. His descriptive passages improved with age but I set Pattern Recognition aside twice as it has no plot whatsoever. Maybe Gibson needs to start taking drugs again to get back the old magic. Read this and afterwards watch Blade Runner and see what the eighties prefigured.
FireHorse More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing book. One of those that started the cyberpunk genre. Like other good literature, it's a story that works on many levels. Gibson explores a lot of themes that have since become staples. What is humanity? What is love? If I experience something so intensely I can't tell it from reality, is it real? And can reality compare? Gibson's prose is at times like one of Van Gogh's paintings. Broad strokes of words that suggest something without providing any fine detail. At other times, he exhibits a laser-like focus and precision, forcing the reader to see something with absolute clarity. His characters are flawed, but by no means simple. Tragic and believable. Reflections of both the dystopian society they inhabit, and our own. So when you read it, don't think to yourself "Gosh, I've seen that a hundred times." Instead think "Dang, this is where those others got the idea!"
achpoppa More than 1 year ago
loved it