×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Newton's Wake: A Space Opera
     

Newton's Wake: A Space Opera

3.8 12
by Ken MacLeod
 

See All Formats & Editions

With visionary epics like The Stone Canal, The Cassini Division, and Cosmonaut Keep, award-winning Scottish author Ken MacLeod has led a revolution in contemporary science fiction, blending cutting edge science and razor-sharp political insights with pure, over-the-top interstellar adventure. Now MacLeod takes this heady mix to a new level with

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Newton's Wake: A Space Opera 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Gurdonark More than 1 year ago
How can a young woman's first mission of battlefield "archeology" go so wrong? In "Newton's Wake", Ken MacLeod takes the reader to a future history grounded in the mystery and folly of our present technological time. As with the best space opera, hard science and satire intermingle in an interesting plot to permit ideas to be made more entertaining by the characters who live them. A technological catastrophe creates a universe in which the people are recognizably human, but the settings as exotic as space itself. The work shapes up into a clash of cultures and of visions of humanity, all told within characters whose behavior is not that far removed from our own time. The narrative covers a great deal of ground in a few pages, yet the story never feels rushed or threadbare. The author wisely does not tell us all the details of his universe, but allows an allusion here and a reference there for the benefit of the jigsaw-loving reader. At the end, I was left pleased with the ride, but ready to return to the folly of my own reality.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Finished Newton's Wake yesterday and found the book very entertaining. The book is about the Carlyles, a family (more like a Mob Syndicate) and their control over the worm holes through-out the galaxy. During an expedition through a new work hole, they end up on a new planet and find some pre-human gear but are soon detained by the planets occupants, who are also human. How did they get there, well, the earth had a huge fallout and a global war. Everyone migrated into space...almost everyone...and this is where the story begins. Is it a Space Opera...yes!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this stand-alone novel about a future human society in the aftermath of a singularity event, the author shows excellent creativity in developing interesting political situations interspersed with smaller scale action, adventure, and mystery. It's not a book you'll want to put down often. My only complaint is that after reading it through one time I felt like I missed alot. For those interested in hard SF, this one has lots of techno-wonders that make you smile as you think 'what-if.' One of my favorites is a society that modifies all of its members so that their facial-recognition brain centers never forget a face. It does wonders for security - everyone knows you once they've seen you once! I liked the novel overall, but found some of the dialects spoken by the Scottish characters difficult to wade through and decipher. This is a wild ride and worth reading.