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A Nietzsche Compendium (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
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A Nietzsche Compendium (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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by Friedrich Nietzsche, David Taffel (Editor)
 

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This convenient new compendium contains the five most philosophically significant of Nietzsche’s post-Thus Spoke Zarathustra writings. Nietzsche wrote of these works that he intended them as “fish hooks” for catching readers who shared his sense that a cataclysmic shift in human psychology had suddenly occurred with the advent of

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A Nietzsche Compendium (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
AbuLydia More than 1 year ago
Thanks so much to B&N for making this compulation of Nietzsche later writings. These books allow the reader a more straightforward look at his thought than Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Also must reading). Nietzsche I think shows what modern nihilism really means. I think the question is do we see this as a positive thing (as he did) or a negative thing (as I do). I definiely don't think that Nietzsche would have supported Nazism (like Heidegger did), he was too anti-German. However, the fact remains that the Nazis were able to use his writings to sefend and sharpen their ideas. I do think that ultimately people will use Nietzsche and more recent Post-modern thought to justify some sort of program to discriminate against those who don't agree with their more enlightened view. On a more philosophical critique I always feel that Nietzsche always just states his position , but never really proves it or tries to argue for it. Nihilism is just accepted as fact. Nietzsche then just draws the logical conclusion. How he can be so optimistic is also a mystery to me. If we look at human history or even just at the people around us, I just don't see how we can be optimistic about people making the right decisions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
These were written in a stage before his devolvement into insanity. Cut the guy some slack. His affirmation of he herd mentality and attack on christian ideals is well thought out. Between this and 'the gay science' id call him a genius.
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Tetragramaton More than 1 year ago
The same way Hitler blamed the Jewish for the fall of Germany, we have here Nietzsche that blames Christianity for the fall of humanity. I never liked this guy as a philosopher because in most of his books, he always talks ( writes) about the same ideologies. As a philosopher i think he never made major progresses , he just got stuck up on one idea. As Emil Cioran wrote '' Nietzsche bashed all the Gods, but himself did create one.''