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One Mississippi
     

One Mississippi

3.9 50
by Mark Childress
 

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"There is nothing small about Childress's fine novel. It's big in all the ways that matter - big in daring, big in insight, and big-hearted. Really, really big-hearted." -New Orleans Times-Picayune

This exuberantly acclaimed novel by the author of the bestselling Crazy in Alabama tells an uproarious and moving story about family, best

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One Mississippi 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To judge from the reviews of other readers, I would say that a lot of people just don't like chocolate with their peanut butter. Or comedy with their tragedy. It's true that this book mixes the two in sometimes unsettling ways - but isn't that what all the best books do? Keep you off guard, laughing one moment, ready to cry the next? I enjoy authors who do that -- like John Irving, Wally Lamb, Anne Tyler. And Mark Childress
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
book_book More than 1 year ago
It took me a while to get into the story but then I couldn't stop reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Childress is great as always
YoyoMitch More than 1 year ago
The opening paragraphs of this novel do what a good opening to a novel is supposed to do – draw the reader in and let them know what they are about to read without giving the story away.  In its opening scene, One Mississippi shows a group of 15-year-old boys spending an afternoon “following the mosquito truck through the streets, breathing the sweet-smelling clouds of DDT because we’d heard it would get you high.” p. 3.  The message – no matter how sweetly it may smell, poison is still deadly.  Mr. Childress spends the next 382 pages concocting a deadly brew that is often hilariously sweet and, in so doing, making the poison all more bitter. Just as Daniel Musgrove is about to enter his junior year of high school, his father is transferred from Indiana to Minor, Mississippi, about 10 miles from Jackson.  Already deeply troubled, the move succeeds in deepening the chasms in the family.  The book is told from the first person point-of-view of Daniel, is set in 1974 the first year of forced integration of schools, a reality that gives the outsider Daniel reason to feel all the more isolated.  The reader experiences the hilarity of Daniel’s Junior Prom (the images of his Tuxedo are worth at least two readings) and is blindsided as is Daniel when the night ends in ways that are life-changing for many in attendance at the prom.  The next six months of Daniel’s life is filled with the confusion, danger, pleasant surprises, unexpected discoveries and meanness one remembers from high school and that does nothing to alleviate the tragedy of that April night. I was much looking forward to reading the book.   Reading Mr. Childress previously has been a delight and his writing skills have only improved in the interim of my previous reading of this author.  The sharpness of his characters, with the vividness of his description of the story’s setting gives this book the breath of live.  His ability to magnify the teenage angst without making it cliché is a gift not given to many authors.  By the end of the book, I was grieving having to say farewell to the Musgrove family, celebrating a bit of good fortune for Daniel and vaguely depressed at what I had just “gone through” in the process of being so deeply attached to this tale. The book contains violence of various kinds – the most painful being the emotional abuse teenagers heap upon the weaker in their midst so aptly described.  There are moments of a sexual nature and graphic sexual language within its pages as well.  I read this book in four days of a very busy week – this was due to my taking every available moment to read it.  Even when I knew I did not want to see what was next, I could not keep from turning the next page.  What more can be said of how well this book is written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Susiewong2 More than 1 year ago
I love This book. The humor and understanding of the South make this an enjoyable time well spent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended. The musical in it will make you laugh and the teenage characters are well-developed. A great read.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Comedy and tragedy blends for a wonderful read. I have never been disappointed by Mark Childress. He always captures the southern soul and conflict in his writing.
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pcj60 More than 1 year ago
Surprise surpise surprise! In my Gommer Pyle voice! Nothing is ever what it expects to be.This book was more than what I thought it was goin to be. It was truely a surprising story. Although there were some dry mind numbing parts that went on a bit long,it was well worth it, once it got going. I could'nt stop talking about it. Almost 5 stars if not for the dry parts.
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Autumn Bjugstad More than 1 year ago
This tale of growing up as an outcast is really outstanding. Comidic, dark and addicting. Within a few short pages you will be in love with these characters and wishing the world wasn't such a cruel mistress.
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