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Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis
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Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis

4.1 34
by Jimmy Carter
 

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President Carter has written importantly about his spiritual life and faith. In Living Faith, a huge bestseller, he recounted the values and experiences that shaped his personal and political life. In his companion book Sources of Strength, also a bestseller, he meditated on fifty-two of the favorite Bible lessons he has taught.

In Our Endangered

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Our Endangered Values 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book takes a look at Jimmy Carter¿s opinions on different sides of the issues that have been going on in the government as well as in society. As a former president, Carter reflects on his past experiences and examples to show what he considers is right. It is a great book that will help provide people with a lot of information about the world we live in along with a man that has his own views on certain topics. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to start to learn more about political issues.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this book, Nobelist and former President Jimmy Carter asserts that Christian fundamentalists have taken control of the American government. Although he is a devout Christian himself, he outlines charges against fundamentalists and neoconservatives that reiterate many oft-aired criticisms of the current administration. He also decries fundamentalist control of the Southern Baptist denomination, which may be of less interest to business readers. However, one need not agree with Carter to be drawn by his political philosophy and sincerity, nor disagree to be bruised by his self-righteous tone. This is more sermon than essay, for it has a pronounced religious focus, but we find that it provides a heartfelt portrait of the value judgments of a historic figure who never hesitated to provoke debate. Readers seeking a liberal focus on issues about which conservatives and liberals disagree will find this to be a passionate touchstone, as will those alarmed by what they perceive as manifestations of fundamentalism in U.S. public policy.
Whomever More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed reading this book.It's good to see a man with deep religious values like Jimmy Carter, who can apply his religious values to the real world without drifting off into the extreme dogma of fundamentalists.Here's a man who clearly applied his religious values to his decision making without trampling on the constitution and who seemed to understand that there are other people,just as honorable as him, with different views of the world.Too many religious people, especially these days, take a rigid view of the world and don't want to listen to other peoples points of view.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is about America's values and how our country has some defects with it that Jimmy Carter feels need to be changed. He gives evidence to show that the U.S. has been handling some situations and topics poorly, but it should not be too hard to change.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book. I have always thought that Jimmy Carter was one of the most misunderstood president's or our time. This book proves just that. He is one of the truly great men of out time. I love that he has comes to terms with his religion convictions and his belief in separation of church and state. This is a must read for everyone who wants to meet a man of vision.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I listened to this entire book one Saturday while sewing. It was like having a long visit with older 'common-sense' family members who are no longer here to counsel me. I loved it! He brought back the America I knew and loved. That America is the America in people's hearts and minds where someone's problem becomes our problems An America where we are neither black or white or red or blue but just Americans trying to make the world a better place for all.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While I am not anywhere near the religious person that President Carter is, I very much enjoyed his keen insight into issues and problems he sees with some of the church groups in this country, and other major problems within our country and with the direction our governmentis going. He is clearly one of our nation's finest thinkers and role models. I highly recommend his book for everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Carter is one of the wise elders in America. He shows us a way of talking about values that is moral but does not moralize. Values are not against humans but for humans. Just the same, Carter's God is not doing violence to people but is there to build people up, and even respects if people choose not to believe in a God. One can't wage war with such a God, nor can one put people on death row (p. 80). Carter calls for moral values centered around a non-violent God. A timely book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Former President Carter, for whom I voted after I registered to vote, upon turning 18, in 1976, has laid out an excellent example of how the current path America is on (based on so-called 'Christian', 'Family', and 'Moral' values, has led our nation to be divided (within itself) and despised (and that's not too strong a word either) (without-i.e., in the larger world community). His assessment of how this current 'administration' and its supporters, on the far (religious?) right, have made things worse, instead of better, by misapplying Christian principles as justification, for example, in the current mess in Iraq. Fundamentalism, a word which has been hijacked, by the likes of Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell, James Dobson, Tim LaHaye, Jerry Jenkins, and others, has been used to justify eroding the separation of church and state. No one doubts that the current 'President'? believes himself to be following Christian principles however, former President Carter, who considers himself just as 'fundamentalist' as anyone else, just as 'Christian', as anyone else, but without the hypocrisy that pervades the current social, moral and political, climate in the United States, makes many valid points on how America has lost it's way, when much of the world, for better or worse, looks to it to lead by example, to provide for others and for ourselves. Of course, Republican conservatives will dismiss this book. The party of Abraham Lincoln has become a mean spirited, name calling, 'holier than everyone else(?)' [who are not like them] political party who are responsible for the current mess in Iraq, and partly for 9/11 as well as the isolation of the United States from the rest of the world. Our nation would do well to listen to the words of the former President, who has been grossly underestimated, [and] who (if he'd been re-elected) might have paved the way for a moral America, without the hypocrisy, that exists currently. God Bless and Help America. And God Bless Jimmy Carter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an important book even if you disagree with some of the conclusions. Carter, like Truman, left office with low approval ratings yet this matters little to the book's content. What Carter has done is to remind us that our policies based on post-911 panic have not served us well. Our national values have been compromised and for the most part unnecessarily. Even after 9-11 few of us would have envisioned the Unites States falling so far as it has with Guantanamo and Abu Ghrib, starting wars against effectively disarmed countries. America has used the terrorism alibi way too long and must start to amend its ways or we run the risk of becoming the world's pariah state.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This, from the President who had the most disfunctional administration in history. At least he exposes who and what he really is about. His answers for the woes of the day are beyond the pale,(surprise, surprise,) and I can find nothing enlightning about this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A sobering and courageous assessment of where America's policies and priorities seem to be at this time. I found President Carter's proposals on a variety of issues neither 'liberal' or 'conservative', but rather common sense. The apathy that has allowed the fundamentalists to push their agenda is pervasive and must come to an end. Hopefully, Carter's integrity and conviction for truth, justice, humility, compassion, forgiveness, and love will serve as an inspiration for Christians and non-Christians alike. This is a must read and a wake-up call for all Americans.
Guest More than 1 year ago
President Carter provides a thought provoking look at many areas concerning our current government and society. From foreign policy to hot button social issues, Carter provides insight on where we have been misled, where we are still united (no matter who tells us we are not), and how we can regain trust from others that we have turned our backs on. President Carter combines his experience in the political arena with home grown traditional religious values to highlight 'Our Endangered Values' and provides us hope that it is not too late to repair the damage.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'What enables ex-President Jimmy Carter to be taken seriously is that millions of people are too young to remember what a disaster the Carter administration was. He lost his bid for re-election in a landslide for a reason.' -Thomas Sowell
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a wonderful book! It gives an incredible insight into current events. Even though I don't share the former presidents views (mostly about the right to choose), I deeply respect his ability to balance his religious beliefs and his respect for the constitution. I have always been interested in political affairs, but am now able to understand the importance of foreign policy. Anyone that wants to know why the United States of America has lost respect around the globe, needs to read this book. Anyone who doesn't vote, needs to read this book. I was born and raised in Germany and have a daughter who is now 21. It occurred to me that I have never heard her and her friends engage in a conversation based on political events! I remember those being a frequent topic for me since I was 14 or 15! My interest in current affairs didn't come from my family. It was inspired (but not shaped!) in school. There is something seriously lacking in the public school system. If other countries can do it, why not the USA? During the first couple of chapters I was a little thrown off by his use of big words, but decided to take it as a challenge (as a foreigner) to learn a few more words. I can't say enough about this book! It has been inspiring and motivating. I hope a lot of readers will find this book, especially the citizens that are going to the polls next time around!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an insightful and informative read. Carter covered the most important issues that our country is facing with the heart of a Christian, the passion of a patriot and the mind of an intellectual. I couldn't put it down.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Consider this book as President Carter's sincere warning letter to America. He clearly points out how this current adminstration has dramatically and systematically undone America. America's good standing is no longer, the Nation is divided, the growing number of poor thanks to massive tax cuts for the rich while keeping minimum wage at an almost standstill. President Carter speaks candidly about his faith and how, as an Evangelical, this administration's actions and the rise of fundamentalist Protestants counter the basic moral principles set forth by Jesus Christ. What scariest about these times is how anyone who speaks up with A VOICE OF REASON and FACTS against this administration (and Bullies like Pat Robertson or Christian Coalition) is sure to be attacked, derided, boycotted, discredited and maligned as un-American and Godless. Thank you President Carter, I respect and admire you. Please know that you are a truly outstanding American and person.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Carter¿s book is deep analyzes of the moral and ethical codes of the USA. This book mirrors the knowledge of Mr. Carter of the moral conflicts of our country. He accomplishes altitude that no other former President has reached. He is intelligent to poise his political thoughts with a clever storybook style that reflects his Southern milieu. The book is educational, consistently inspiring, and motivating. I recommend his book to anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
No one is PRO-Abortion. Let me guess...you are a man. If men were the ones who had the babies, trust me, women would have absolutely no say in this issue. How dare any man have the arrogance to try to tell a woman what to do when he could never find himself in the position to make that difficult a choice. How easy it must be for you to say you know for sure exactly what you would do. You have no idea and never will have any idea. President Carter must understand that very simple point. This is between a WOMAN and her God. Period. If this right is ever taken away from women we need to figure out a way for it to affect the man who got her pregnant. How about sterilization for him. How does that sound?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jimmy Carter, the most prolific of former commanders-in-chief, has come out with his twentieth book and surprisingly the first that is overtly political. While the book is an incisive and decidedly critical look at Bush's foreign and domestic policies, it also reflects the mass of contradictions that Carter has represented as both a political leader and a man of faith. His commitment to human rights informed his presidency, but his limited abilities in campaigning and governing reflected a certain naïveté about public policy implementation. Carter takes full aim at the fundamentalists. Fundamentalism, Carter writes, has three attributes: 'rigidity, domination, and exclusion'. He explains that the rigor by which Bush has courted the religious right has induced a domino effect of pain points for the country - tax cuts for the wealthy, proposed spending cuts to social programs, utter disrespect for human rights, cruelty toward prisoners in Iraq, a despoiled environment and an imperialistic foreign policy. These are the indicators of how far the US has fallen, in particular, becoming a pariah in many countries. Once a moral beacon to the world, the US, according to Carter, has fallen in its global standing due to the influence wielded by fundamentalists over our policies. Carter's perspective comes from being a devout Southern Baptist, a faith that has been adamant about the separation of church and state. Consequently, he derides the unprecedented historic merging of church and state under President Bush, as he provides valid reasons to distrust religious hierarchies and respect the autonomy of local congregations. There is no question that Carter is a religious man who believes Bush's Christian faith but not to the extent of informing government policy. Fundamentalism has gotten this country into a mess, but he sincerely feels religion can once again help the nation finds its soul. Granted, there are times when Carter treats the reader like a Sunday school student, but he is overly cautious when he moves back to the political when examining the details of Bush's policies. This is where the book falls a bit short as he skirts around more secular issues such as the environment or counterterrorism as if he is running for office again. Probably out of respect for the office he once held, Carter seems reluctant to point a finger at Bush, and to some extent, I admire his restraint. However, a dispassionate tone surfaces periodically, and Carter's voice without prophetic urgency has a tendency to sound more like wonk-speak than a man propelled by the power of the Bible. Bush is not the only one he puts to task, as he also expresses hesitation about his own party as well. He states emphatically that Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry failed to connect with deeply religious voters by appealing to their sense of logic and overemphasizing controversial topics like abortion rights. At 81, Carter is showing himself to be far more of a renaissance man now since he left the Oval Office a quarter century ago. This book illustrates how the distance of twenty-five years lends his perspective a resonance that none of the anti-Bush brigade could muster. This is a highly recommended read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Former President Carter was recently asked why he was breaking the tradition of prior Presidents not criticizing a current one - his response was that 'Our Endangered Values' is not a personal criticism of President Bush, but of his reversal of policies established back to Eisenhower and including those of Bush I. Carter than goes on to summarize the major source of today's moral problems, and a number of adverse results from these declining values. Ironically, Carter (a life-long deeply religious man) identifies fundamentalism among Christians, Hindus, Jews, and Islamists as the major source of today's moral problems. Those involved are convinced that 'since I am aligned with God, I am superior and my beliefs should prevail. Others are wrong and inherently inferior,' thus setting the basis for conflict. Such groups are generally led by authoritarian males who consider themselves superior, are committed to subjugating women, and demagogue emotional issues. Examples within the U.S. include the Southern Baptist Conference's establishing its leaders as the 'sole authority over faith and practice' in 2002, Pat Robertson arguing that the separation between church and state is a 'lie of the left,' Jerry Falwell and Robertson stating that 9/11 was partly in response to pagans, abortionists, feminists, gays, and lesbians, and former Sentator Danforth (also an Episcopal priest) stating that the Senate now spends more time worrying on the effect of gays on marriage than the effect of the deficit. Injurious results include the U.S.' ludicrous and counterproductive fixation on Cuba, rejection of any reasonable basis for an International Criminal Court (U.S. wants BLANKET immunity for itself and Americans), the breakdown in progress with North Korea (per U.S. accusations and hardline posture), prolonging and acerbating Arab-Israeli relations - particularly via approving expansion of Israeli settlements (some fundamentalists hope this will result in major war and the return of the Messiah regardless, it has scuttled the 'road to peace), unwarranted jailing of a majority of those held in the war on terror - and especially their torture, violating the nuclear proliferation treaty (encouraged Russia and China to upgrade their arms and rethink positions on 'no first-use'), our pre-emptive war on Iraq (giving Iran, North Korea and others justification for nuclear weapons programs), and a failrue to push energy conservation (ANWR drilling is a mirage of a solution). Carter believes that the greatest concern of the new millenium is that growing gap between rich and poor. Diseases and malnutrition in developing countries are obvious issues, aided by skimpy U.S. aid compared to others, and perhaps due to our large war/defense expenses. (Some claim that recent American support for 2004 tsunami victims 'proves' our generosity - Carter simply points out that many more die each month due to malaria, AIDS, etc.) Similarly, cuts in U.S. support for American poor also evokes Carter's concern. (In the case of 'farm aid,' Carter points out that half goes to the top 3% of U.S. farmers - like Bush's tax cuts.) President Carter ends by pointing out that superpower status does not just come from military power - a commitment to truth, justice, peace, freedom, humility, human rights, generosity, and cooperation are also needed and would revive the faith and historic values of our past 230 years. Its amazing (and scary) how much has been undone in the past five years.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jimmy Carter was a marginally unimpressive president when he was in office, he only became a noteable humanitarian after his service was up. This book brings up lots of interesting and pressing issues confronting our country today the war on terror, abortion, the death penalty, income disparity. It peaks your interest but does little else since it briefly glosses over them, never spending more than 15 pages on any one topic. It's kind of a tease and you would be better off reading two or three books which focus on one of the specific issues. It is well written and surprisingly moderate and might be enjoyed if you want a brief overview of the moral problems in America today.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As an evangelical young adult I am so grateful that President Carter is speaking up for our moral values at this dark time. The success of this book is more evidence that a real movement is arising in America within all churches, evangelical, Protestant and Catholic that is challenging fundamentalism, violence, materialism and awakening America to a deeper Christian journey. A path with Jesus that values all people as made in God's image, that appreciates the gift of reason, and celebrates creativity. Thank you for your humble, faithful leadership President Carter!