×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids
     

The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids

4.2 40
by Alexandra Robbins
 

See All Formats & Editions

"You can't just be the smartest. You have to be the most athletic, you have to be able to have the most fun, you have to be the prettiest, the best dressed, the nicest, the most wanted. You have to constantly be out on the town partying, and then you have to get straight As. And most of all, you have to appear to be happy.” – CJ, age seventeen

High school

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Overachievers 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
katie ward More than 1 year ago
this was a very thouhtful and thorough book. i related very much, being that i was applying to colleges in the midst of reading it. i really enjoyed this book and highly recommend it!
theish94 More than 1 year ago
This book has is very enjoyable. It contains many characters, each one with their own story to tell. Alexandra Robbins gives an interesting peek into the lives of the most driven, talented, and overworked students around the nation. I like how she puts in interesting facts on the subject of our educational system. I think it could have a wide audience because it's not only for students but also the parents, educators, and the people who support them.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic and too true. I think any student could relate to this book. It had the perfect blend of facts and the personal lives of the students Robbins interviwed. In places the facts are dry, but the kids lives are interesting and makes one forget they are reading a non-fiction piece. I read this for my AP English class and would highly reccomend it!
Charlotte_Isabella More than 1 year ago
"The Overachievers" is a great book. It reads like a novel and is never boring. Alexandra Robbins makes it interesting by having first hand accounts of Overachievism. She observes a total of five students and tells it like it is. She does not sugar coat the good, the bad, and the ugly. She explains why one observee loses her hair due to stress, and how one Overachiever's mom loses custody of one of her children because she never lets them have a life. It tells of the pathetic battle to maintain perfectionism and the competition to get into top ranked preschools even before the aforementioned child is born. This is a captivating tale of what one goes through to be perfect.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a diligent, hard-working high school student myself, I found The Overachievers: The Secret Lives of Driven Kids completely engaging. Straight-A students with numerous extracurriculars and high test scores are commonly stereotyped as untouchable, unrealistic, and plain nerdy. However, Alexandra Robbins¿ novel brings to life the routines, stresses and lifestyles of driven students. It showcases the goal-oriented society in which students across the country are sacrificing their teenage years just to get into a ¿good¿ school. Parents especially are overlooking the benefits many non-Ivy league schools have to offer. Despite statistics proving otherwise, people are still fixated on the fact that attending a recognized undergraduate school will guarantee lifetime success. Robbins approaches her novel very appropriately by telling the stories of several high school students of differing interests and ages. Personally, I identified most with Julie, a senior perceived as ¿the superstar.¿ Her life was completely swamped with cross-country and track practices as she tried to balance a rigorous AP schedule as well as volunteer work and honor societies. The thing that struck me so much about Julie, as well as the rest of the characters, was how astonishing her introduction was. I almost didn¿t want to continue reading, let alone apply to some of the schools she was considering, because there seemed to be no way to compare to such an applicant. But as I read further, I realized every last one of these students had flaws. They felt so much pressure to compete against their classmates that they were joining new clubs just to add to their college resume, whether or not they enjoyed the activity. The novel opened my eyes to many of the practices, including cheating, which many committed students feel pressured to execute. It is not that any of these overachievers are lazy they simply don¿t have enough time in the day to complete all of their work. The number of applications to the most selective colleges has skyrocketed over the last few years, and with the rising number of applicants comes rising expectations. Everyone thinks they need to take a million AP courses (well, only 16 in the case of ¿AP Frank¿), while still being the number-one varsity athlete, editor-in-chief of the school newspaper, and class valedictorian. However, by interviewing a few readers of college applicants, Robbins put to rest some of the rumors regarding how over-blown resumes are attractive to colleges. The only blemish in her statistics was how some responses only consisting of 25% of opinions were portrayed as an overwhelming majority. Though all of us applicants strive to look perfect on paper, the reality is that not everyone can be accepted into top-tier schools. However, happiness attained by every student by the end of the novel is proof that hard-working students can make any college their ¿perfect¿ fit. Very well-written with morals pertinent to any college applicant, I would highly recommend this novel to any stressed-out senior.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am disappointed..... while it explains my life, it does not assist me in moving to the next step....
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best book of the admissions genre, and perhaps even of the high school genre. A quick read, engaging, pulls you in, leaves you feeling like you really care about these kids. A gem of a read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a 21 year old college senior and I could NOT put this book down, it seemed like she was describing my life for the past 10 years exactly! I immediately sent a copy to my parents and after reading it they said they finally started to understand what I mean when I discuss the new pressures facing teens today. Well written and very engaging!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am currently reading this book and it is very well written. It describes teenage situations with reality and I'd recommend this book to everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful, to put it simply!