×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right
     

Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right

3.4 14
by Thomas Frank
 

See All Formats & Editions

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice

From the bestselling author of What's the Matter with Kansas?, this witty and highly provocative book asks a simple question: How is it possible that the disastrous collapse of the free market economy in 2008 could have heralded a popular revival—of the right?

In Pity the Billionaire, a

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Pity the Billionaire: The Unexpected Resurgence of the American Right 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Frank opens the door to help the reader see beyond the indecipherable blather of politics, into the machinery of the political right. "Pity the Billionaire" makes clear the motivations that are tearing this nation apart. The reader sees the reprehensible and unconscionable push to worship Market & Money, at the expense of the very fabric of this Nation. This book should be read by all who have a stake in America's future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thomas Frank's book is a brief disposition on the ironic state of American politics today, where the very class — yes, let's use the word — that led us over the brink and nearly destroyed the capitalist world order still dominate the discourse and ideals of our democracy
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thomas gets it right and with great detail. Corporate thieves gambled and lost after buying politicians who removed all the safties, then looted the treasury to get there losses back with our tax money for bad measure. The only downside to this book is that Thomas never makes a connection between movements like the Tea Party and the culture wars. People are willing to sell even themselves down the river over them and Thomas comes close but never seems to understand that as the answer to his confusion over the Rights quick resurgance after the 2008 economic collapse. Highly reccomended though, a book that needed to be written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I couldn't believe that half of this book consisted of notes - references and quotes from others' statements. I got half way through and Frank's writing just stopped. Probably won't buy another of his.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lacks details! Calls people liars but doesn't discredit their facts. Author is suffering from typical overconfidene in government intervention. Claims to blame repubs and dems for 2008 stock crash, but only assaults conservatives. Never explains liberals blame for fanny, freddy, or housing collapse. Claims to understand conservatives, but never shows the simplest or basic understanfing of conservative thought. Book reads more as a childs tantrum than an honest assesment of really anything but the greed of wallstreet. Governments greed never even enters his feeble mind. Only free thinkers should read this book due to possibility of brainwashing to other feeble minded people.