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Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis
     

Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis

3.8 11
by Michael Ward
 

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For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and

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Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AHHHHH!!!! This is NOT Narnia. Its simple. The books are based on the Bible for C.S. Lewis's Goddaughter. This is waaaaaayyyyy overthought. Just telling you, get the ACUAL books. So much better than this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HELP CANT FIND MY FRIEND KLOE!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If a 6 grader can tell you that then you really are an idiot. I think he overthought Narnia. Its an AWESOME series and Lewis based it off the Bible for his goddaughter Lucy. The writer of this book is acomplete idiot.
Guest More than 1 year ago
heard Dr. Ward speak back in the summer of 2006, and I was instantly both a fan and a skeptic. His theory about the reason for seven Chronicles of Narnia is fascinating, beautiful, and¿so I thought¿implausible. But since Dr. Ward was a very compelling speaker and he¿s coming to speak at the school where I teach (see his tour schedule at planetnarnia), I bought the book and am in chapter four at the moment. Wow! I¿m more a fan than ever, and barely a skeptic. I¿ve come to the conclusion 'like Jim Como' that if Dr. Ward is wrong, it doesn¿t even matter, because his reading is completely lovely, plausible, useful, scholarly, thorough, and everything else a critic¿s reading can be. But it¿s more, too. It seems that he is inside of C. S. Lewis¿s head, thinking CSL¿s thoughts after him 'if that¿s not sacrilegious!', quoting from all CSL¿s works as glibly and facilely as if he wrote them 'or more CSL was notoriously forgetful of his own writings, though of nobody else¿s', tying together disparate elements with ease and grace. His memory is prodigious, his scholarship impeccible, his writing clear and organized, his case lively and delightful. If Narnia needed any boost in popularity or any raising in the academic mind, here it is!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
U totally dont understand. I dare u to read the book of mormon, then narnia am then tell m i u still think the same.