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The Poisoned Serpent
     

The Poisoned Serpent

2.6 8
by Joan Wolf
 

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Norman England has little to celebrate in the new year of 1140. The country is immersed in a bitter civil war from which no one is immune, including Hugh de Leon, heir to an earldom. His Uncle Guy has arranged his marriage to the spoiled daughter of the newly named Earl of Lincoln. It is a merger that will combine two of the land's largest fortunes -- and give the

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Poisoned Serpent 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book ties up the loose ends left at the hasty conclusion of No Dark Place, but it doesn't measure up to her earlier works. The main characters were flat and overly predictable, as was the story's conclusion. It was an enjoyable book, but I had expected more from this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nothing compelling here. No character development. No atmosphere or sense of period. Too many other authors do this era better....much better.
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harstan More than 1 year ago
It has been less than a year since Hugh discovered that he is a De Leon, the nephew and heir to the Earl of Wiltshire. Kidnapped when he was eight, Hugh was raised as the foster son of the Sheriff of Lincoln and his wife. His new rank in society brings with it the expectation that he will enter into a marriage that will increase his family¿s power base. The obstinate Hugh plans to wed Cristen Haslin whose father the Lord of Somerford is a vassal to Wiltshire.

Hugh is prepared to give up his new position and elope with his beloved Cristen. However, before they can complete their plans, Hugh learns that his boyhood friend is accused of killing the Earl of Lincoln. Hugh knows his pal could never perform such a heinous task. He rushes to Lincoln to ferret out the identity of the real killer even though the adjudicating officials are convinced that recent military events tie Hugh¿s friend to the crime.

The civil war that raged in England between the forces of Matilda and Stephen affected nobles and commoners alike albeit in different ways. It is during this turbulent time frame that the events in THE POISONED SERPENT occur. Honor is something that can be purchased for a fee or some land, and truth is judged by whom is in control at the time. Joan Wolf is a talented storyteller who writes a clever historical mystery starring an engaging hero whose ethics makes him stand out among his peers. Fans of medieval mysteries will want Lord Hugh and his band of merry followers to return in future engagements.

Harriet Klausner