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Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker
     

Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker

3.7 22
by James McManus
 

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In the spring of 2000, Harper's Magazine sent James McManus to Las Vegas to cover the World Series of Poker, in particular the progress of women in the $23 million event, and the murder of Ted Binion, the tournament's prodigal host, purportedly done in by a stripper and her boyfriend. But when McManus arrives, the lure of the tables compels him to risk his

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Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Last review was in 2008!!! Its been six years!!! Lol
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Great story of the WSOP and of the Binion trial, but it is unfortunately weaved in with useless narrative of McManus's upbringing and far, far too much flowery language for a poker book. I can understand a writer/player trying to tell a story of their life and times at the Main Event, but come on now. This book could be 75 pages shorter and pack just as much punch, as apparently someone who teaches literature feels the need to prove that they know lots of words.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is meant for people outside the world of poker, not poker players. It is far too wordy and full of (insignificant) detail. I would suggest something else if you are looking for further insight into the game itself, and not on physically getting to the game or background information of people somewhat involved in poker. The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King is a much better recount of a substantial poker game in my opinion. I was able to read that several times, whereas I was skipping paragraph after unneccessary paragraph in this book. (Notice David Sklansky's enthralling review)
Guest More than 1 year ago
What a great book. You don't have to have an interest in poker to like it, though that helps. I really just sank into this book like a warm bath, and just felt I was right with him on his journey to Vegas. I was less interested in the Binion trial aspects, but the book is so well written that there was not a chapter that didn't invoke interest, humor, and insight.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Interesting read. Although impressed with his research, the sideline tangents were a little dry and easy to skip. Combining both his tournament experience and the Binion case was fun to read. My husband, who never reads for fun, could not put down this book although I bought it for myself!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Coming from a guy that has never read a book voluntarily, i bought this book to fulfill my 24/7 poker crave and it did just that. McManus describes his journey to the WSOP beatifully. I couldn't put the book down and i ended up finishing the book in 2 sit-ins
Guest More than 1 year ago
Reviews of this work seem to fall into two distinct camps. Those who thought McManus bit off way too much, and those who loved his approach. You see my rating, so you know where I stand. I'm a mild poker fan, mild Vegas fan and have been in Binion's twice in my life. But I love a good read. Just as murder trial coverage, poker tutorial or autobiography alone, the book would have worked great. As all three, and much more, it's one of the best books this avid reader's read. Alas, though, readers of some reviews and the book's cover jacket won't have one hook that I enjoyed. I had no idea how McManus did in the tourney until I read the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
James McManus' book 'Postivitely Fifth Street' is 'postively' one of the best pieces of leisure reading I have read. It is a very easy to read book. As for the poker story and information, as long as you can read what McManus says and use the index of poker terms in the back, you should be fine. A lot of people say that the book is disconnected, but I thought the story flowed well. The Catholic background, as well as the other non-Binion murder or -WSOP info helps to understand the murder situation in some cases. McManus tries to look at his own life, and what influences he experienced, and see if he can maybe understand the situation Ted Binion found himself in, which led to his death, via being burked on his bedroom floor. A great read for poker lovers, legal lovers, murder lovers, and lovers in general!
Guest More than 1 year ago
People are way too nice in reviewing this book. A lot of people recommended it to me, and when I picked it up, I lost all motivation to read: it was slow moving, choppy, tangential and utterly boring when it could have been a lot more. It was as though McManus was trying to write a Complete book of Poker instead of tell his story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Interesting where McManus talks about the actual tournament, but he's all over the place throughout the novel. Who really cares about his Catholic childhood? We read the book to hear about the WSOP and the Binion trial, not McManus' life philosophy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An absolutely remarkable book: an exciting page turner that shows the relationship between Amarillo Slim and Sylvia Plath, among other things. Positively Fifth Street is a difficult book to describe, because it is about poker at the highest level, the people that play the game, and, as Douglas Addams would put it: 'Life, the Universe and Everything.' McManus manages to be gritty, realistic and gripping while being deep and erudite at the same time. Did I mention that he also covers the Ted Binion murder trial, growing up Catholic and twentieth century poetry, as well as the key strategies for winning at Texas Hold'em. How can you ask for more?
Guest More than 1 year ago
If Mr. McManus had just stuck to the story instead of worrying about all the literary references this would have been a very good book. It is a great story, but the author makes it much more difficult to follow than it has to be. It is about a murder trial and a poker tournament for goodness sakes, not the theory of evolution...interesting subject matter.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was an okay read, but the author is all over the place...there's about four side stories going on during the book and it makes for a difficult read in my eyes. The poker tournament stuff is pretty exciting, but it's difficult to read about poker if you're not used to it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
McManus had unbelievable material to work with -- he finished FIFTH in the World Series of Poker. Do you know how difficult that it is do? So what does he do with such incredible material? Buries it. Incredibly, he chooses to starts the book -- in a chapter ridiculously titled 'The End' -- with an imaginary scene of a murder! He starts his incredible true-to-life story by writing fiction (and bad fiction at that)! Then he bounces around for half the book, never quite getting into any semblance of a narrative groove until finally -- at long last -- we get to Binions and the WSOP, and his incredible, awe-inspiring march to the final table. That section of the book is aces; if it had been a magazine piece (well, it WAS a magazine piece), it would have been perfect. But the Binion murder trial, the Good Jim and Bad Jim interaction, the worry about his wife and daughters, all the other hand-wringing and book-padding are not only poorly executed but they are astonishingly boring. The book has an unsettling disjointed feel and by the end, when McManus hurries to the courtroom to hear the Binion trial verdict (he undoubtedly imagined we readers would be sitting on the edges of our seats to hear the verdict), I was literally yawning and racing to get to the book's conclusion. It's too bad. There's a great book buried here; you need a lot of patience before you finally find it, and then it doesn't last nearly long enough.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book makes for a very tough read if you are not familiar with poker and the terminology used by McManus. Even constant reference to the glossary left me feeling confused. I also found his 'Tom Clancy like' writing style frustrating as he jumped between covering a trial, playing in the tournament and writing about the history of card playing.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Harper¿s magazine hired novelist James McManus to write an article on the World Series of Poker. The magazine is interested in the relatively new phenomena especially the impacts of female players, information technology on the game, the murder of Ted Binion of the host family, and the subsequent arrest and trial of a stripper and her boyfriend. Once McManus arrives at Las Vegas¿ Horseshoe Casino he rationalizes that to truly write this article, he must participate. Being an apartment house player, McManus risks his advance to join at the table......... POSITIVELY FIFTH STREET: MURDERERS, CHEETAHS, AND BINION'S WORLD SERIES OF POKER provides great depth into the mindset of the cast (not just the card players, but also the groupies) than the original article that Harper¿s magazine published. Mr. McManus is at his best when he reports his guilt over the hedonistic pleasure of the game and side benefits while leaving at home his wife and daughters. The rest of the story, mostly fulfilling what his editors want as described in the paragraph above, is well written and engages the audience through the use of poker vernacular and metaphors. Still the first-hand account at the table draws the final card in a royal flush nonfiction work that casual card players will enjoy........... Harriet Klausner
Guest More than 1 year ago
When the "short" version of this came out in Harper's Magazine, and then in BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2001, people start talking about how it was the best poker article since A. Alvarez's "The Biggest Game in Town." I agree. Apparently so does Alvarez, from reading the quotes on the jacket (as well as those from Ira Glass, David Sedaris, Billy Collins . . .). What I don't understand is why the author would want to visit a strip club in Vegas, given how beautiful his wife is (if you can tell anything from the picture that adorns chapter 2.) Anyway, this is one wild, adventuresome book.