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A Presumption of Death (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series)
     

A Presumption of Death (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series)

4.1 32
by Dorothy L. Sayers
 

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Sixty years after Dorothy L. Sayers began her unfinished Lord Peter Wimsey novel, Thrones Dominations, Booker Prize finalist Jill Paton Walsh took on the challenge of completing the manuscript—with extraordinary success. "The transition is seamless," said the San Francisco Chronicle; "you cannot tell where Sayers leaves off and Walsh

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Presumption of Death (Lord Peter Wimsey/Harriet Vane Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 32 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have been a Sayers fan for more years than I care to admit. While I enjoyed Thrones, Dominations, I thought it was not quite Sayers. A Presumption of Death is, however, excellent. I would like to see Patton Walsh try again - with or without help from Sayers. The glimpse of English country life just before the Blitz begins is worth the price of the book. Add the bonus of Harriet and crew and you have a winner.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1940,the siren testing the warning system goes off in a remote English village. Except for the Methodists, everyone including Harriet Vane, better known as Lady Peter Wimsey, enter the cave used as the air raid shelter. After a long time, the siren finally ends signifying all clear. Everyone leaves the cave only to find the corpse of a Land Girl, ¿Wicked¿ Wendy Percival, lying in the street. Knowing he is already shorthanded due to the war effort and her experience as a crime novelist, Superintendent Kirk asks Harriet to investigate the murder that is clearly not the work of a Nazi. He wants her to perform the role of her spouse Lord Peter, overseas on government work, to make inquiries and report back to him, but not take risks. Reluctantly Harriet begins her investigation starting with the other eight Land Girls, but quickly she finds reality much more complex and stranger than fiction. Using fictional letters that the late great Dorothy L. Sayers wrote in support of the English World war II efforts, Jill Paton Walsh paints a powerful amateur sleuth tale that fans of the Wimsey tales will enjoy and will appreciate the cleverness of the endeavor. The story line insures that the regulars remain true to their known personalities while WW II in a remote village is used to provide the background of a strong who-done-it. Still, this tale belongs to the cast especially Harriet who provides a fine time for series fans and historical mystery readers. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jill Paton Walsh has captured the spirit of Sayers' characters so well, and brought them into the WWII era. Very entertaining and absorbing.
LovinClassics1 More than 1 year ago
Usually I'd give Lord Peter Wimsey books a 5-star, but this one was different. It is slow with not much mystery involved besides, yes, Wicked Wendy's body was found, whodunit? Trying to figure this out, Harriet is asking around maids and servants and random people whom it tells you absolutely nothing about them. Opposite this, on other things, it tell you too much about things no one cares about much. Yeah, yeah, move on; where's that 4-star awesome everyone was talking about? And besides, why would they try to let Harriet solve the case when obviously this is Lord Peter Wimsey's mystery series, not his novelist wife's! Sure, maybe I would recommend this to a friend because it had a good plot scheme and characters, but not because I like Wimsey figuring things out better. Why did Wimsey have to go on a somewhat "business trip" even though we know it's not, just another mystery the writer won't tell us about? I definitely like his two other books with Harriet Vane and his older series much better. I hope this helped. Overall: good reading literature, but not necessarily the book I am looking for.
ALEXANDRIAMARBLE More than 1 year ago
Highly recommended! Having read the complete series over the years, I felt like I Was meeting an old friend. Any one interested in the time period, culture and manners of England btetween the Firsr and Second Worlld Wars should enjoy it. Would make a good book for a discussion group.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just what Sayers would have written
Still_Reading_KidLit More than 1 year ago
If you can't get enough of Lord Peter et al, then Jill Patton Walsh's two collaborations with Dorothy Sayers should be on your list. Walsh does a great job with these beloved characters. She is not quite as esoteric and impenetrable as Sayers is at times--the quotes that precede chapters actually make sense to me, whereas Sayers' references are often too oblique or obscure. Readers should know Walsh worked with Sayers' material and was chosen to complete these works by the Sayers estate. This is not just another writer using, say Austen's characters or re-imagining Jane Eyre.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A slo
prussblue10 More than 1 year ago
An excellent read. It was good to follow the Wimseys' into the early WWII period (for the UK, circa 1939). J.P. Walsh did an excellent job of finishing the ground work that had been laid by Sayers and did not get to finish. If one likes the period and the previous Wimsey titles, you may want to try this. I am glad that I did.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
And i think one of the best of the four busa
dr_cac More than 1 year ago
Honestly... I've just begun reading this book but if it's as enjoyable as the 1st and 3rd then I hope it is the beginning of a great partnership. Sayer's Lord Peter should be well known to any mystery reader but I think Walsh does an admirable job of following Sayers style and yet bringing it up to date. Again... for any mystery reader, if you've not read any of Walsh's work 'collaboration' with Sayers, you are missing a real treat.
nookpj More than 1 year ago
A collaboration of DLS and Jill P. Walsh, this story is set in the midst of WWII. A domestic murder case is linked to a military plot which affects both Harriet and Peter and their family. JPW did a fine job in blending her talents to unfinished extracts left by DLS. This is an enjoyable treat following on Thrones, Dominations.
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A bit too much history, not enough mystery. A bit too much Harriet, not enough Peter. Great for WWII buffs, but if not, not.
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