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Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science
     

Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science

3.7 13
by Lawrence M. Krauss
 

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Perhaps the greatest physicist of the second half of the twentieth century, Richard Feynman changed the way we think about quantum mechanics, the most perplexing of all physical theories. Here Lawrence M. Krauss, himself a theoretical physicist and a best-selling author, offers a unique scientific biography: a rollicking narrative coupled with clear and novel

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Quantum Man: Richard Feynman's Life in Science 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
LarryEd More than 1 year ago
Don't waste your time with this book. Feynman's own books are much better and clearer. Read Feynman's QED to get some real insight into his thinking.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book goes into (great detail) about Quantum mechanics and the BOMB. If you know what QED and QCD are then this book is for you. If not, you will learn what they are. It is (heavy reading) but has its surprises. One was how much of a womanizer Richard was, like many male celebrities. You see the O ring on the cover of the book. That has to do with the Challenger. He was a very involved scientist.
BadgerWI More than 1 year ago
A perspective on Feynman from his scientific contributions, which can still be seen in Quantum Computing today. Seems he was busy calculating and solving problems right up to his death. Also covered his entrance into his now famous lecture series, which I now understand undergraduates were somewhat too intimidated to take (and not many passed.) I have one copy of the lecture series myself which I page through from time to time, If you have no science background, or interest in science this book is probably not for you. It delves somewhat deeply into his science and what he accomplished in that realm, and not much about his personal life,
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