×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Red Glass
     

Red Glass

4.0 18
by Laura Resau
 

See All Formats & Editions

“A captivating read.”—School Library Journal, Starred

One night Sophie and her parents are called to a hospital where Pedro, a six-year-old Mexican boy, is recovering from dehydration. Crossing the border into Arizona with a group of Mexicans and a coyote, or guide, Pedro and his parents faced such harsh conditions that

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Red Glass 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was so amazing, I reread it so many times, and never got bored of it. I used this book for one of my English projects, and it all worked out so well unlike a lot of books I try. If there was ever a sequel for any reason, I would read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Red Glass is the story of a teenage girl trying to break out of her shell. When 6 year old Pablo comes to live with Sophie's family everyone is happier, except Pablo. After nearly a year Sophie's dad contacts Pablo's extended family and Sophie has to take Pablo back to visit his family but soon learns to fight for what you believe in and just how important family is.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im still wondering if theyll make a movie on this
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I would definately recommend this to anyone
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hey huys if u are reading this then please tell me if you would recomend this bok 4 me
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was exciting and thought provoking:D
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Laura Resau's RED GLASS was an amazing read. It's a wonderful mixture of excerpts from Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's THE LITTLE PRINCE, eccentric people, political unrest, and magical fortunes folded into a cross-continental summer road trip.

Sophie is an amoeba, a free-floating spirit who is not attached to anything besides her family and her books. Then one night she picks up a phone call from the hospital. Seven Mexican migrants and their guide have died crossing the Arizona border. The lone survivor is a six-year-old boy named Pablo who had Sophie's stepfather's business card in his pocket. Pablo comes to live with Sophie, her parents, and Sophie's great aunt Dika, a Bosnian war refugee. Sophie grows to love her Principito, or Little Prince, but after a year her parents get in contact with Pablo's remaining family in Mexico.

Over the summer, Sophie, Dika, Dika's boyfriend, and his son must take Pablo back to his hometown so that he can choose between his new family and his birth family. The trip is hard at first, because Sophie is afraid that anything and everything will go wrong. But the stories and the struggles of her companions change her perception of danger and she grows attached to Ángel despite her fears that she will lose him. When a terrible accident occurs, Sophie is forced to make a dangerous trip by herself. On the way, she realizes that while life has its risks, it is still beautiful and even fun.

I loved this book. One of the things that was really well done was how it was multi-cultural without being culturally exclusive. Even though some of the dialogue was written in Spanish, it was still easy to read. But the best part of the book was its characters. They are both hilarious and tragic, but never melodramatic. At times, I felt as if author Laura Resau was in my head. Teens will identify with Sophie as one of their own.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's certainly not like anything I've ever read before. The characters are so real with their quirks 'especially worrywart Sophie'. The story had multiple layers that talked about immigration, strength, different cultures, independence and so many other things. The descriptions of Mexico Village life were not to get corny luscious 'especially the romantic swim' at the same time staying real to the condition of the villages and the obstacles they had to overcome. I also liked Resua's book What the Moon Saw. It felt very familiar at times, but was also executed very well. It's a thought provoking book that at the same time is exciting for those who aren't big on heavy themes. The book was a sad one, but also was a title that celebrated life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is muy mucho bad