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Regeneration
     

Regeneration

4.2 22
by Pat Barker
 

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In 1917 Seigfried Sasson, noted poet and decorated war hero, publicly refused to continue serving as a British officer in World War I. His reason: The war was a senseless slaughter. He was officially classified "mentally unsound" and sent to Craiglockhart War Hospital. There a brilliant psychiatrist, Dr. William Rivers, set about restoring Sassoon's "sanity" and

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Regeneration 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AP World History Review: Horrors of War Regeneration, a historical fiction book by Pat Barker, recounts the experiences of the patients in Craiglockhart War Hospital and their doctor, Dr. Rivers. Rivers job is to help his patients recover through helping them recount their war memories. Pat Barker uses the memories of his characters to reveal the horrors caused by World War I. Regeneration is a string book about opinions and overcoming obstacles. Dr. River’s role is to help his patients overcome the obstacle of their rears and horrors that they experienced in World War I, but in doing so is forced to listen to and picture the gruesome tales. These experiences therapy sessions in the end of the book change the overall opinion the River’s has on the war. Pat Barker’s characters are in a wide variety, but have a similarity, they all have a specific dislike of the war, and are afraid to return to it. Pat Barker successfully displays the horrors of the many veterans of the Great War.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are an ethical man, how do you change another man's mind about the war he has been fighting, a man recognized for heroic action and his concern for his troops? And a man who is a well known poet--whose words always have meaning, and are not part of Orwellian Newspeak? Barker's novel effectively dramatizes the discussions Dr. W.H. R. Rivers may have had with poet Siegfried Sassoon in order to send him back to the trenches of WWI. Because Sassoon had publicly accused 'those who have the power of ending the war' of prolonging it, his friends, particularly Robert Graves, arranged and encouraged his admission to the psychiatric hospital rather than punitive disciplinary action. Regeneration has been labeled an anti-war novel--and it is hard to be pro- war ever after the fact when reading of the realities of trench warfare during WWI. More important, the novel's presentation of the dilemmas posed to both doctor and patient raise questions for us about the rationale for war, the role of politicians and businessmen and the public's sheeplike acquiesence, and the morality of 'brainwashing' or other efforts to change people's minds. The great irony is what happened after the book's coverage of events: Sassoon returned to the war, and unlike so many of the young poets who fought in it, he lived to old age--but did not write as much poetry in his middle years. And Robert Graves, who appears as a good manipulator of people and events, lived also to old age and greater fame than Sassoon.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have finished Pat Barker's work, and still find that I'm drawn to it. When reading the book, I felt I was in 1917, walking through the hospital with the characters. I came away knowing Dr. Rivers, and wanting to talk more with Seigfried. I've read about WWI, but Regeneration made me feel that I was there. As a boy I lived next to a WWI German soldier, who briefly talked to me about his side of the trenches. This book gave me a glimpse at the horror he must have witnessed.
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Loved it. Had to read it for class but ended up enjoying it anyway.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book looks at many of the social issues confronting society in the midst of the industrial revolution and the horror of the war to end all wars. Insightful and thought provoking in relation to the first diagnosis of PTSD?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a great resource for those looking for a general idea of what society was really LIKE during Word War 1. This book was intriguing from the begining. By creating a somewhat fictional story, the author was able to express the difficulties of the doctor, Rivers, to treat those suffering from war neurosis. The end of the book was especially exceptional as it brought together the rest of the story into a sort of climatic point that supported an idea of anti-war in today's society. By writing a story about World War 1, the author was able to confront a somewhat controversial topic of today: to war or not to war? By stating history as it was, she was able to prove to the readers that war is destructive. Even from the point of view of soldiers, they would for the most part agree that war is destructive. So, the author did an excellent job in conveying her views to the reader and successfully supporting it.
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ChasF More than 1 year ago
It is clear why she won the Booker Prize--this is an enthralling novel
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"You are NOT dying on me." She mumbled.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"What killed you?"