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Safe at Home: A Novel
     

Safe at Home: A Novel

4.4 12
by Richard Doster
 

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The spring of ’53 started out like any other for sports columnist Jack Hall, as he and the rest of his small southern town, Whitney, eagerly awaited the magical first pitch that would open the Bobcat’s season. But when ticket sales wane with the new distractions of air conditioning and I Love Lucy, the Bobcats face an early end not only to the season

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Safe At Home 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
groverc53 More than 1 year ago
I loved this story - fiction/but true. I have cried, laughed, remembered things I would rather have forgotten. I was hooked almost immediately and could not put it down. This is a great read, even if you are not a baseball fan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I totally thought this book said it was free, but it was not. Was charged$9.99 for it. This is like the third time this has happened to me. So I guess it is buyer beware. Hope the book is worth what I paid for it.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story takes place in 1954, an era where segragation is beginning to come out yet so unique how one family stood for what is right. A family who saw a unique situation who knew the truth, respected their authorities. Through adversity they pull through the struggles.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GabinaFS More than 1 year ago
Safe at Home By Richard Doster Percy Jackson is a 17-year-old third-baseman who has a battling average that any major leaguer would envy. He has a great swing, can pitch and is an all around player. But, he has a major strike against him. He is black. Back in 1953, in the small town of Whitney where everyone knew everyone's business, having a black man on the town's baseball team was unheard of. In 1953 prejudice is a disease as deadly as Aids. It spread through small, Southern towns, igniting fear and wreaking havoc. Which brings me to my review of Richard Doster's debut novel. The story sheds light on an important issue: Does the color of your skin make you a better person, and in this case a baseball player? Why do we judge people by their outer shells, and not by what's inside? How sad that many people felt that they could not mingle and become friends with those of other races. How sad that they missed out on many new friendships that they could have enjoyed for a lifetime. Jack Hall watched Percy Jackson at practice one afternoon and wrote a sidebar in the Whitney Herald, the paper he worked for, sparking a chain reaction that would stir up this small town and create a wedge among friends, neighbors and even family members. But this is a mere taste of what's in store when Percy Jackson comes to play for the Whitney Bobcats, a last ditch effort to save the financially struggling team. Charley, the coach of the Bobcats; Jack Hall, the reporter; Rick Dolan, the owner of the team and many others think long and hard about a solution for saving the team. Raising ticket prices, charging for parking and raising the price of concession-none of this will cover the costs of keeping team alive. But a black player would draw new fans, and increased ticket sales are the team's only salvation. The Bobcats sign Percy Jackson and hope for the best. Town meetings, discussions and one-on-one conversations don't sway or convince opponents, including Jack's wife Rose Marie, who's dead-set against it (you will have to read to find out why). It is baseball and it is a great sport. I loved watching the Yankee's play at the stadium in the Bronx. I rooted for the home team and was proud to say that I came from the South Bronx. I played punch ball and kickball-in the street and at the park-where no one ever cared whether you were black or white. If you wanted to play, you were included. My Dad coached the teams, and everyone played. Whitney was not the South Bronx, and the people there had a lot to overcome. The end of the story may surprise you. Families and friends are ripped apart and friendships die. Violence erupts and a small town is changed forever-as is Jack Hall and his family. Author Richard Doster takes us back to a time where people of different races did not mingle. They ate in their designated areas and sat in different parts of the bus. He tells the story of one small town, where one man-Jack Hall-and one young Negro, a 17-year-old boy, have to endure the criticism, racial slurs and indignations inflicted on them. As Percy Jackson comes to bat or is about to pitch a ball, he hears the jeers, cheers, and comments made by fans. Jackson is a rare young man, able to tune out the malevolent crowd. He does not outwardly show his feelings or let anyone know that he is hurt. But, that's not all he has to endure. Jack Hall is a man with a mission, and so are the manager of the team, Charley, and the mayor, and ma
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is play room. Go to next result.