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Salt: A World History
     

Salt: A World History

3.7 120
by Mark Kurlansky
 

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Mark Kurlansky, the bestselling author of Cod and The Basque History of the World, here turns his attention to a common household item with a long and intriguing history: salt. The only rock we eat, salt has shaped civilization from the very beginning, and its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the history of humankind.

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Salt 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 119 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I LOVED this book! I learned a lot about history, from ancient civilizations all the way to the origins of common everyday products that we take for granted every day in the 20th and 21st centuries. Loaded with details, ancient recipes, and new revelations in practically every sentence on every page, I walk away from this book with a renewed sense of awe that civilization ever got this far. Not for the timid reader, details can be overwhelming at times, but never boring. Not if you like history and the "untold story", as I do.
booksonmynook More than 1 year ago
I liked this book. Read it within 24 hours.Unusual but very interesting history on salt
Guest More than 1 year ago
Salt: A World History By Mark Kurlansky Review By Crazy Edward. Salt, its a commodity most people just accept as something that is available in their everyday lives. Think about it, we all use salt every day, yet we don¿t realize how the fate of an empire rests on salt. Mark Kurlansky starts out by diving into ancient China and their exploitation of salt. As Kurlansky reports, the Chinese first start using salt when they found salt rocks on the ground. When it rained, a brine soaked into the area around the rock and when the sun came out, the soil produced salt crystals. This is a very interesting read for any food lover or historian. Mark Kurlansky identifies the rise and fall of civilization, and what salt has to do with them. From the ancient Romans and their salt works and fish sauces, to United States struggle to find enough salt to maintain the needs of their country, Kurlansky writes about them all. As an added bonus for all food lovers, Kurlansky publishes recipes for salt and salt-based products. If you love food, or if you just find the rise and fall of civilizations interesting, Salt: A World History is a must have. Salt. You don¿t know how much it really means until you read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Who'd -a thunk it? A book about salt being utterly engrossing? That it is. Smart and funny, full of wonderful trivia and a way of seeing world history through this most common yet complex of substances. You need not be a foodie to enjoy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kurlansky shows how Venice came to be as profitable by trading in salt rather than attempting to manufacture it, which later formed a foudation for Venice during the Renaissance. The French Monarchy did as many other empires at the time and since the trade of salt, a tax was placed upon the rock. These are but a few topics discussed in Kurlanky's Salt, but inbetween are some tasty tid-bits 'o information and surprising history as far up as the Civil war and Pickett's Charge. Although Salt tends top be of a repitive nature in expressing views, but this helps to re-convey his theories so that you will know how he wishes his 'novel' to be interpreted. Overall, I would reccomend this book to anyone with a sense of humour (it is an entire book about salt, of course) or anyone wishing to gain a new perspective in viewing world history through a common element--Sodium Chloride, the good old NaCl.
LAT72 More than 1 year ago
You'll find yourself wondering about other commodities.....like cod and coffee and beer. Did they influence people in unexpected ways?
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love salt, and have always felt like a nerd for being strangely fascinated with its history. Not only does this book include a historical aspect of the mineral, but also entails palatable facts and a very in-depth view into salt's naturally unassumed importance through the ages. I do not feel alone in saying that this is the book I have been waiting for!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I never thought I could read an entire book about SALT! However, I was immediately intrigued and after promising myself to give the first 30 pages a chance, I found myself reading the entire book. It is oftentimes funny and always educational. I have amazed my family and friends with my command of salt facts and trivia. Not recommended for those on a salt free diet.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Packed with informatiin bur keeps moving and keeps interest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So I have to read this book for school, and it is interesting and all, but I am honestly falling asleep as I read it and I only have one week to finish. This is going to be a long week. I guess history is not my thing. Oh well it is still interesting.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was shocked at how much I liked this book. It was actually a book that I couldn't put down. I would definitely recommend this for history lovers!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
And I thought salt was stuff you just sprinkled on your food!
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Informative but dull at points.
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