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Seizure
     

Seizure

3.3 28
by Robin Cook
 

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The New York Times bestseller is now in paperback.  Power, religion, and bioscience collide in the new novel from the master of the medical thriller.

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Seizure 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Dr. Daniel Lowell leaves his secured tenured position as chairman of his department at Harvard to open his own research company specializing in gene therapy. He develops the HTSR technique, which involves replacing a part of a person¿s DNA that causes a particular disease with DNA that is disease free. His research is so cutting edge that Senator Ashley Butler is sponsoring a bill that will outlaw the technique. Senator Butler, the most powerful man in the Senate is diagnosed with Parkinson¿s Disease, which will end his hopes for running for president.

Unable and unwilling to accept defeat the senator approaches Daniel with a proposal that will benefit them both. He will quietly drop his opposition to HTSR if Daniel will use that technique to cure him. He also wants the DNA to be used to come from the Shroud of Turin and he uses his powerful connections to get the Church to give Daniel a sample. The operation will take place in a private medical facility in the Bahamas if Daniel and his beautiful assistant can outrun and outwit Italian police and Mafia hitmen.

Robin Cook once again takes readers to the edge with this action-packed chilling medical thriller. He raises some very interesting social and moral issues and make it clear that politicians should not be the ones who decide whether a new medical technique should be available to the general public. SEIZURE is Robin Cook at his very best.

Harriet Klausner

carlosmock More than 1 year ago
I would only recommend you read this book if: * You are a die-hard Robin Cook Fan. * You liked SHOCK, and understand that Spencer Wingate and his cohorts at the Wingate Clinic play a relatively small but central role in this book. * You are interested in the medical aspects and the ethical debate concerning cloning and stem cell research. * Finally: you are a speed reader who only skims most novels for the central element of the plot and are not bothered by unlikable characters and uneven writing. The plot is as described the book jacket. Dr. Daniel Lowell, a brilliant medical researcher (previously employed by Merck) resigns the Harvard faculty to start his own biotech firm. He is joined by his younger associate, Stephanie D'Agostino, with the hope of commercializing a procedure developed by Daniel, HTSR (Homologous Transgenic Segmental Recombination). Their future is threatened when the powerful Senator Ashley Butler threatens to introduce legislation banning the procedure at a time when Daniel's firm is in need of a further cash infusion from his venture capital backers. Meanwhile, Senator Butler's staff research has led him to believe that the HTSR treatment might successfully provide a cure for his recently diagnosed but rapidly progressing Parkinson's Disease. (Since it would threaten his political career, his disease has been a closely kept secret, known only to his long time aide Carol Manning and his physician.) There are several subplots including a DNA sample extracted from a fragment of the Shroud of Turin, the use of the facilities of the Wingate clinic (which has relocated to the Bahamas), and Stephanie's family connections to the Boston Mob (in an unbelievable use of stereotyping). As the author has explained, he wants to use his books to inform and enlighten, as well as preach whatever happens to be his message of the moment. However, in the process he forgets that his stories should also be interesting and entertaining. He claims that he needed to research the political aspects of this book in D.C., and yet the political insights are minimal. The information on the Shroud of Turin was new to me, but the segments on therapeutic cloning were much too technical and lengthy to maintain my interest. Thus a story with several potentially interesting subplots and which had the potential to involve an interesting discussion of the potential ethical dilemmas involved in biotech experimentation tried to do too much and as a result accomplished almost nothing. In addition, without exception the characters were totally unlikable stereotypes and caricatures. Daniel was a selfish individual lacking in judgment who was only interested in fame and fortune; the Catholic clergy were primarily interested in their political goals; Senator Butler was a totally self-centered fraud, Stephanie was portrayed as the typical female companion who was too weak to resist Daniel's and the Senator's plan even though her instincts and her intuition told her it was wrong and would probably fail; finally, the distractions caused by her family had no discernible purpose except to lengthen the book. And if you plan to read this book to find out what happened to Spencer Wingate, Paul Saunders and Kurt Hermann you will be disappointed as well. Even the dialog and the writing style seem unnatural for much of the book. I recommend you read the jacket review and go buy another book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting plot, quick read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Robin Cook continues to amaze me with each book. I loved the "divine intervention", mixing science and such an interesting and controversial topic as the shroud of Turin. I enjoyed the book so much it only took me a couple of days to finish. I surely recommend this book to any long time fan and even more to a new fan!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This had the potential for a great read, however, there was zero delivery in the plot. In my mind, the strength of the plot and ending are indicative of the author's skills. If you you want information on stem cell implantation and related topics, there are plenty of non-fiction reference books available. However, if you're looking for a great novel with a suspenseful ending, please be aware that Robin Cook did not deliver in this one.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a very average book. Compared to the other Robin Cook novels I've read, it was very disappointing. However, in general, it wasn't the worst I've ever read. The premise of the story is a little far fetched, yet very interesting. However, something about the novel turned me off a little--I wouldn't recommend this book, but if you love Robin Cook already, go for it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was just getting into the plot and premise and realized there were only 10 pages left. DNA from the Shroud of Turin and stem cell research mixed together had such great potential and then it just ended. Mr. Cook must have been up against a deadline or he just got bored. Either way, I'll be careful in the future when buying Cook's stories.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've always enjoyed Robin Cook's writing, there's no doubt he's brilliant. However, this book was an absolute disappointment!! Its almost like he got bored and gave up on his creative thinking by ending the book abrubtly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must say that I enjoyed this title. I agree that there was no reason to include the mafia aspect. I generally enjoy the all but the last few pages of any Robin Cook novel. I really enjoy the medical 'faction.' Although, my opinion has been somewhat biaseded working in the medical field. All in all, good book, disapointing ending.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book might have been better if the Mafia and accompanying descriptions of real or possible bone crunching had been deleted at publication. There was no need for sleazy criminal characters - the plot had enough interesting premises without violence being thrown in. However, no premise could hold up against the two main characters. They are unbelievable in their naivete, their dialogue only serving to reflect their coldblooded insensitivity and downright stupidity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very disappointing book by Robin Cook - not that any of his efforts are literary masterpieces - but a few of them are lively and entertaining. (This wasn't one of them.)SIEZURE consists mostly of rambling events of a couple of misguided researchers, the 'mob' (as in other Cook books), and some other bad guys in a 'plot' (that only crops up from time to time) to carry out groundbreaking stem cell implantation. I wouldn't recommend wasting time with this one!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel was different from other books that Robin Cook has written. It was exciting but I thought it was going to have a much more exciting ending. Either way is worth reading. It is like the following story of Shock but you dont have to read Shock to understand this novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
WOW SO ONLINE WITH THE HEALTH ISSUES OF ADVANCES IN MEDICINE WHICH ARE VERY DISTURBING THIS COULD HAPPEN!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book had the makings of a plot but fell victim to really silly dialog. I kept imagining Dr. Lowell played by Eugene Levy! Perhaps Dr. Cook would do better if he got a 'collaborator' who can write zippy dialog without sounding stilted.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Excellent book, Cook knows how to keep you from falling asleep. I have read many of his novels and he just gets better. Love the Wingate Clinic, hope to see it back again soon in future novels of his. I will tell anyone to read it but first read ¿Shock¿ so you will have a better understanding, if not¿.you will be fine.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read every one of Robin Cook's books and his last two, Seizure and Shock, just didn't cut it for me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was to me by far, the worst of Cook's works. The plot could have been full of intrique but it just became so difficult to get through that I couldn't wait for it too end. I kept thinking I should stop reading,but I was expecting it to get better. It didn't.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robin Cook has a point to make with this book about the issues surrounding cutting edge advances in cloning. Unfortunately, he does so at the expense of a taut, concise, plot. There are too many loose ends and rehashed elements from prior works that offset an intriguing premise. Readers may find the Shroud of Turin and Mafia subplots to be perplexing dead ends. Which brings one to the all too abrupt end of the novel. Perhaps there is a sequel looming to sew up those loose ends.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The latest novel by Robin Cook, SEIZURE, is a masterpiece!