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Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment
     

Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment

3.9 11
by Mike Mooneyham
 

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“Current fans and recovering Hulkamaniacs alike should find [Sex, Lies, and Headlocks] as gripping as the Camel Clutch.” —Maxim

Sex, Lies, and Headlocks is the ultimate behind-the-scenes look at the backstabbing, scandals, and high-stakes gambles that have made wrestling an enduring television phenomenon. The man behind it all is

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Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you want a full biography of Vincent Kennedy McMahon, then this is the right book for the job. However, it covers much more than that. In some way or another, everything mentioned did affect Vince and the WWE. You'll read about the old days of wrestling which included the legendary Lou Thesz as well as 'Nature Boy' Buddy Rogers, risks Vince failed and made big on (i.e. the XFL & Wrestlemania I respectively), Vince's purchase of the World Wrestling Federation from Vince Sr., Vince's ruthless acquisition of territories, striking it big with Cyndi Lauper and MTV, Crockett Promotions, Ted Turner, the birth of the now defunct World Championship Wrestling, Terry 'Hulk Hogan' Bollea's ego, the steroid scandal which heavily involved Bollea, Bollea's defection to WCW, why Lex Luger didn't become the star Vince wanted him to be, the deaths of the British Bulldog, Miss Elizabeth, Owen Hart, & Brian Pillman, the Montreal 'screwjob,' the Monday Night Wars, the relationship of the McMahons and the USA Network, Vince's acquisition of WCW and Extreme Championship Wrestling, and much, much more. Disappointments: The authors made the story rather difficult to follow at times. In many of McMahon's business deals and the like, so many people (no-names) were involved, it was hard to understand which no-name was being discussed. I found numerous typographical errors throughout the text that led to some confusion. Books that sell for this price shouldn't have these said errors. The World Wrestling Federation changing its name to World Wrestling Entertainment wasn't discussed. There's little mention of this. Some of the detailed history of the sport was a boring read at times. Much of it wasn't relevant in what exactly it had to do with McMahon.
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Jga1635 More than 1 year ago
I thought the book was a fast read and had a lot of great stories and background information. I don't actually view it as a 100% biography of McManhon, but it did give a detailed account. So much has happened in the last 10 years that a sequel actually makes sense. Great read.