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Sharpe's Havoc (Sharpe Series #7)
     

Sharpe's Havoc (Sharpe Series #7)

4.4 35
by Bernard Cornwell
 

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Bestselling historical novelist Bernard Cornwell returns to the battlefields of the Iberian Peninsula with Sharpe's Havoc, where the lieutenant and his men bravely fight the French invasion into Portugal.

It is 1809, a few years after Lieutenant Richard Sharpe's heroic exploits on the battlefields of India and at Trafalgar, and Sharpe finds himself fighting

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Sharpe's Havoc (Sharpe Series #7) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As series go, the Sharpe series is historically accurate and action oriented. However, the local villain in this volume, comes across rather 2-dimensional, when compared with Sharpe's other foes. He's certainly as big a villain as the others but he could have been more developed, in my opinion. He's no Sgt. Hakeswill nor Captain Lavisser. On the other hand, there is more development of some of Sharpe's riflemen other than Sgt. Harper. An altogether enjoyable read that lays the groundwork for the next episode in the Shape saga.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1809 in the Iberian Peninsular, though isolated from his side¿s main forces, Richard Sharpe and his unit defend Oporto, Portugal from Napoleon¿s armies. The city and the surrounding area are home to the famous red wine and numerous influential English red wine-exporting families. His superior Captain Hogan assigns Richard to keep safe the House Beautiful wine heiress Kate Savage and keep an eye on slick Colonel Christopher.

As Richard and his commandos perform their current mission, the French attack them. Portuguese irregulars led by philosopher poet Lieutenant Vicente save the beleaguered English. The two units consolidate heading to Kate¿s winery only to arrive, as she is to marry treacherous Colonel Christopher.

In his eighteenth appearance as a soldier during the Napoleonic Wars era, Sharpe lives up to his name, retaining a keen freshness as he battles the French and the bureaucracy. The tidbits from history, of which there are plenty, are brilliantly interwoven into the taut story line so that the audience receives a smooth plot yet know what is fact and what is Bernard Cornwell¿s vivid imagination. Anyone who relishes the era, enjoys war stories, or is a historical buff should read the Sharpe novels that bring in focus the realistic atrocities of battle as few novels short of All¿s Quiet on the Western Front has achieved.

Harriet Klausner

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cronraptor More than 1 year ago
Good, typical, Sharpe story but I have to admit that after reading all of the Sharpe books, some of them several times, I don't recall Cornwell using so many run-on sentences, seriously some of them take up almost an entire paragraph and can be quite distracting, it's something I'll have to look for as I reread his other books but otherwise a satisfying read and not overly burdened with battle descriptions like Sharpe's Waterloo and others.
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