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The Lost Era: The Buried Age
     

The Lost Era: The Buried Age

3.9 53
by Christopher L. Bennett
 

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Jean-Luc Picard. His name has gone down in legend as the captain of the U.S.S. Stargazer and two starships Enterprise. But the nine years of his life leading up to the inaugural mission of the U.S.S. EnterpriseTM to Farpoint Station have remained a mystery -- until now, as Picard's lost era is finally unearthed.

Following the loss of the

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Star Trek 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 53 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not one of the best ST:TOS novels, but not bad. It's meant as a fill-in between the encounter with V'Ger, & The Wrath of Khan. Kirk's having the usual problems with being stereotyped as hero or villain, Spock's working through the aftereffects of his mind-meld with V'Ger (& the bigoted attitudes of some Vulcans), McCoy's dealing with new medical technologies & biologies he's never met before & feeling somewhat inadequate. And the other 'originals' are having their own problems. This on top of being sent to deal with a theological clash turned physically violent among some old acquaintances.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I continue to enjoy the cross-over incorporation of elements from The Next Generation television series. The continued character development has definitely improved the flow on this novel. It was a good read and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys the Star Trek Universe.
Solarix-Star More than 1 year ago
An interesting concept in star trek taking you outside what is considered the federation. A great read if a little abstract at times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesome book! This novel finally answers why it's usually only starships that experience time displacement problems and why it's nearly impossible for the proverbial "average Joe" to travel back into time to change something minor in regards to a mistake he may have made in his life. It also tackles the subject of what the point of any action is since there is an infinite amount of alternate realities where that action would never have taken place or would have had numerous outcomes. And they're actually refferng to the Manheim Event and the Berlinghoff Rasmussen debacle!! Finally!!!! This novel is a gold mine of one-off characters that have appeared in Star Trek lore never to be seen or heard from again. It was nice to not only see them again, but find out how the DTI was founded (a foundation that was based in canon). And, FINALLY, a reason is given why the Guardian of Forever acted the bizarre way it did and why it made no sense of what the Borg did in "First Contact." Certain species that we rarely ever saw after their initial introduction are finally seen. Even the mystery surrounding VGER is solved, to a degree (though it's just one little line), the reasons for the convoluted differences in Kes' version of the "Year of Hell" and what really happened in the "Year of Hell" after she left the ship, and why Janeway wasn't immediately arrested after blatantly ignoring temporal laws when her future self brought her crew back sooner than they ever should have been in "Endgame." Lots of new species shown and it's refreshing that these species really have no need for the Federation as they have their own political realities. Lots of species from the past and future that have never been seen in a Star Trek novels before. The book also fixes mistakes made during Star Trek's television run (especially "Enterprise's." Up until I read this book, I didn't realize how many stupid ENT storyline errors there were), the fact that it couldn't possibly have been Samuel Clemens in "Time's Arrow," (or at least why it is highly problematic that it was him), etc. And not only that, but the book features a plethora of incredible insights in regards to how some individuals viewers always thought were right are wrong, vice-versa. Benevolent beings seem more sinister and those that have been maligned by history seem to have actually had good intentions, after all. It also makes it very clear that the universe did just fine before the Federation and will do so after. It actually fixed the mess that the "Temporal Cold War" was on ENT (not an easy thing to do!). I genuinely loved reading this book!
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Arthur Schwab More than 1 year ago
This book is simply outstanding. It excellently ties in the events of the Typon Pact series while expanding into an untapped area of the Star Trek universe while also challenging modern day concepts of time that the average person would otherwise never think twice about. This is a must read for ant Trek fan!
717Reader More than 1 year ago
First, who thinks a book that says "STAR TREK" on the cover is a Star Wars book?! Anyway, this is the first ST book I have ever given up on. A third of the way through and I've yet to determine if there is even a plot. The movement back and forth through time is cute for a book about time travel but it just makes the story confusing, especially when reading on a Nook. I consider myself moderately intelligent and educated but this is just a pain, reading should be enjoyable. There are so many wonderful ST books out there, don't bother with this one.
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