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Star Wars X-Wing #10: Mercy Kill
     

Star Wars X-Wing #10: Mercy Kill

4.1 30
by Aaron Allston
 

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The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back in an all-new Star Wars adventure, which transpires just after the events of the Fate of the Jedi series!
 
Wraith Squadron: The elite X-wing unit of rogues and misfits who became legends of the Rebellion, specializing in carrying out the most dangerous and

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Star Wars X-Wing #10: Mercy Kill 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Skuldren More than 1 year ago
As odd as it might sound, my initial impression of Mercy Kill was “this isn’t a dumb book.” What I mean by that is that there’s a lot more to it than just a fun Star Wars action and adventure. There’s meaning here. Characters are created with frustrating flaws, but Allston maintains an interest that implores the reader to questions why. There’s an underlying compulsion to look deeper and find the truth, be it with the characters or the plot. There’s a sense of depth there that’s very nice. Sure, on the surface there’s some fun action but beneath that is the good stuff. There’s a lot of layers to Mercy Kill. On top is a mission to find evidence of General Thaal’s crimes. Enveloping that is some fun, action twisting spy schemes and Wraith humor. There are a lot of good elements that make the book an enjoyable Star Wars story, but Allston doesn’t stop there. Below the surface plot and Wraith action is a character drama that adds a lot of emotional weight to the story. This may be an X-Wing novel and a Wraith book, but at it’s heart, it’s a story about Piggy. It’s not often that we get to see minor Expanded Universe characters explored in such detail. Piggy was a fun and interesting character in the old Wraith books and in the Rebel Lines duology during the NJO. However, I never in my wildest dreams expected him to get his own book. Not only that, but Allston takes that fan character and uses him to explore a plot line entrenched with emotion. This isn’t the story of a super funny, talking Gamorrean who can fly. This is a story about a veteran of the Yuuzhan Vong war whose been pulled in for one more mission. He’s suffered in war. He has ghosts that haunt him. Allston sheds some light on the soldiers of the EU and the guilt and grief they must deal with. He illustrates the effects these wars have on the people, and he also shows what they must go through to deal with it. Overall, I loved how the simple idea of a Wraith book became something much more complex, and yet still accomplished both tasks. This is a novel that’s fun and is also one that makes you think. Together it’s pure entertainment on the page.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been glued to my nook and this X-Wing novel. The previous installments have been filled with excitement and adventure and this one did not fail to deliver. This novel never had a dull moment and always kept moving, leaving me to wonder what else could happen? I really hope that there are more Wraith and Rogue Squadron books to come.
LordVader501 More than 1 year ago
If you like puzzles and continuous action throughout, then this is your book. This book has some new and interesting characters, as well as some of the famed originals. I had hoped Wedge Antilles played a larger role, but his was simple, which didn't detract from the story. Aaron Allston does a good job of grasping your attention throughout the whole novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was hesitant to pick this book up since the series ended years back. I amglad i did! With new characters ably filling the void and an unexpected change in leadership it expertly continues the wraith squadron legacy.
JDDavis More than 1 year ago
I must say Aaron Allston has a way to truly capture the adventure and action of Star Wars. He manages to fluidly tie in this novel with the previous Fate of the Jedi series and even with some flashbacks to previous story arcs. If anyone enjoys the adventure of Star Wars, the humor of team work, and even some mystery, this is a great book.
Anonymous 29 days ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love this series!
Skip_Wiley More than 1 year ago
X-Wing - Mercy Kill: Oh, mercy. This was a bit of a struggle to read. The much-anticipated return by Allston to the Wraiths was a let down. The whole time I was reading this novel I felt like I was missing something. A LOT of somethings. The book is written in such a way that these characters and their back stories seem to be something the reader is already supposed to know. Face appears in this novel so little that he wouldn't even qualify as a supporting role. It's pretty much Piggy's story. That's alright - I like Piggy. But the gap between Solo Command and Mercy Kill is so large - with so many wars in between - that it just felt like a gulf that couldn't be crossed. Too many missions have occurred in those intervening years (unbeknownst to the reader) that I don't recognize any of the characters. The familiarity with which they speak makes it clear that they know each other and there's a feeling of expectance that I should therefore know them as well. I'm left wondering if these were characters from the X-Wing comic series that were introduced there but never to the EU novel reader. Furthermore, the plot just didn't make a lot of sense to me. Previously, the Wraiths were out to get big bad Warlord Zsinj. Good for them - that made sense. He was big and bad. This time around, though, the mission is unclear. "We think this general is dirty and we're going to prove it." Ok... What's the motivation? Where's the imminent threat? Oh, someone had a suspicion and passed it to Face to check out? Seems pretty thin. Through a series of missions - some told in too little detail, some in too much - the Wraiths claim to have found the proof they were after. However, as the reader, I question the logic there. The proof they find is that there is, in fact, some shady dealings going on but they never find anything that proves that the man at the top was directly involved. Sure, people in his organization are guilty, but the man himself? They cling to that with such determination and it turns out to be correct, but the entire time I'm questioning why they're leaping to these elementary conclusions with such conviction. I just felt like this plot was something slapped together because a few bucks could be made. Oh, and where's the squadron? Weren't these supposed to be pilot commandos? There were no squadrons and no starfighters except for one brief scene with two of them. But I hardly think that's worth the title of "Wraith Squadron." I don't want to suggest that there weren't any enjoyable parts to this novel. Allston did his usual great job of capturing the wit and cheerful mayhem that is Wraith Squadron, but the feeling wasn't the same because it was a cast of strangers (with only one or two exceptions). In short, it was a decent read but it was not a Wraith Squadron novel.
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Made me want to go back and read the whole Wraith/X-wing series.Hopefully there will be more.Hint. Hint.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of the books in the Star Wars series. Many different authors contribute to these books. Aaron Allston is one of the best. It is good to see the saga continuing into the children of the original characters.
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The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back! Well, kind of. In a completely not really sort of way. If this story is "getting the band back together", it uses the Axl Rose style instead of the Blue Brothers. The main character is a pilot featured in the Wraith trilogy from earlier in the X-Wing series. And he's recruited by another member of the old Wraith squadron days into the events of this book. And we have a cameo appearance by a few others as they show up for a scene or two and then disappear. But everyone else in the cast is either a totally new face to the series, or the offspring of characters we've followed before. And that's about all the description we get for some of these new characters. They're the offspring of characters X and Y, and are highly skilled at Z, and there's your character development. The timeline at the start of the book makes me think that there's a thirty to forty year gap between the last Wraith Squadron story and the start of this book, so I guess its probably for the best that we have some new blood to play with. But everyone of the other X-wing titles where we've started with a ninety percent new cast has done a better job of introducing the new guys and gals to the reader. Now maybe part of that is my perspective. I fell away from the Star Wars novels before the events of the New Jedi Order series. So I missed that, the Legacy of the Force novels, and the Fate of the Jedi books. And maybe if I had read through all of those novels, I would have been introduced to some of these characters sooner. As for the plot, it's a little fuzzy early on. There was a moment about half way through the book where it finally clicked for me, and I was able to go "okay, this is why they've been brought together, and this is the enemy they're going after". And at that point, I was invested in the story. But at the same time, I was wondering if I had missed the early explanation of what was going on. If a brief sentence or two of why this story was taking place was missed while the squadron pulled a job or two to establish a cover identity. I almost felt like I needed to re-read the first half to figure out where the second had come from. But after I bought in, I was happy. The usual Allston sense of humor was there, and I cared enough about the main character to find out what was going to happen to him. I was even willing to accept that for an X-Wing title, this features the least amount of space fighter combat I've ever read in a Star Wars book. What's here is okay, but it's not the return of the Wraiths I was hoping for
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yessssssssssssssss
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The green male twi'lek walks into the empty room and sits at the top of a very large table. Waiting for others to arrive. (Make up a name, decide on a star wars speices and pick a gender also come up with lightsaber colours that you have and how many) he toys around with his red and green lightsaber (AND NO IM NOT PART OF EMPIRE!)