×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Cat Who Walks through Walls
     

The Cat Who Walks through Walls

4.0 26
by Robert A. Heinlein
 

See All Formats & Editions

A fast-paced, science fiction romp through multiple universes from the bestselling author of Starship Troopers and Stranger in a Strange Land.

“[Heinlein] is, if possible, a greater genius than ever before...this time by giving us a thinking man’s Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.”—San Francisco

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Cat Who Walks Through Walls 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have not read Heinlein for many years, and thought I might enjoy this,one of his last works. I am two thirds into it, and in the middle of one of those long tedious passages where Richard and Gwen spar sexually with each other. At this point the narrative  has come to a stop and after having put the book down for a few days can't get back into it. again. He the author calls it a comedy of manners, and that may explain the absurdly whimsical dialogue and manner in which everyone talks to eacplot each other. I have since read a few reviews and don't feel like finishing it, and that is unusual for me. A lot of the latter part connects with characters and situations in Heinleins other books, and that makes it a great in joke for some of his hard core fans,but probably leaves the rest of us to go HUH !  A great opening chapter that begins the book well,  but the book starts to fizzle quickly WITHE rambling banter between Gwen and Richard in chapter two. Heinlein is notorious for being a male chauvinist, but the character of Gwen is the most interesting one in the book. Unfortunately given the rest of the book,that may not be saying much.
TechnicalDifficulties More than 1 year ago
Boring ramblings from an otherwise master of science fiction.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is truly an odd, almost nonsensical read from a Grandmaster of the Science Fiction genre. Published in 1985 just three years before his death, The Cat Who Walks Through Walls appears to be in many ways a summation and celebration of Heinlein's life, with protagonist Dr. Richard Ames standing in as the author's alter-ego. According to posts on wikipedia, several characters who appear in the book's final act are major characters from other Heinlein stories, including Lazarus Long and Jubal Harshaw. Although the book's subtitle is 'A Comedy of Manners,' there's not much funny going on here. Basically, the plot is a seemingly random series of events and characters with a lot of chatty dialogue that rambles on and on with no end in sight. The ending was merely frustrating and unsatisfying, although fans of Heinlein might feel differently (having only read one Heinlein book before this one, I have to admit a lack of perspective). Recommended for fans of the author only!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book gets mixed reviews everywhere you look. Some hate it while others soak it all up. I guess I lie between them. Yes it is a very good book, but it is not one of Heinlein's best. Also, to understand much of what is going on, the reader needs to be familiar with many 'World as Myth' books beforehand. Either way you have it, Heinlein is sure to bring some controversial issues to light. Keep an open mind with and about manners, that seems to be easily overlooked.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an incoherent, nonsensical book that has been a great disappointment. My apologies if I offend any RAH fans or any others. The story begins with Richard Ames, a successful writer having dinner with Gwen an apparent woman-about-town, when a mysterious person shows up at his table and gets shot. There is no reference to this incident in the rest of the book, but the story describes the misadventures of the pair as they are dragged from one listless scenario to another. Neither the scenarios nor the characters are convincing. There are too many pointless references, characters and discussions that are not properly explained. Who is Bill? Who is the Galactic Overlord? Was this book really necessary? If it is a satire, the point is lost on me. True Terran life is riddled with car dealers,landlords and women whose character changes by the minute. There is little in RAH's style that I could appreciate except his abrupt and bizarre sense of humor '....whereupon Herr nameless had materialized and sat down uninvited..' I have read Heinlein's Starship troopers, but cannot say I really enjoyed it, except for the story.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read Time Enough For Love when I was something like 11, Stranger in a Strange Land a year or two later, but forgot about reading Heinlein. From what I remember of his other books, this one is exactly along his style. I enjoyed the dialogue as well as the storyline and admired the fact that he created the most depthful characters I've read yet. I don't know what to think about the ending though.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite THE CRITICS' review of this book in striclly literary terms, this is without doubt the funniest piece of sci-fi I have seen in a long time. HINT-Didn't YOU ever want to do something just for fun?
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was outstanding. It has everything from action to side splitting rhetorical comments. The ending also was astounding. Mr. Ames is a great character.
Guest More than 1 year ago
truly an amazing book almost un parralled