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The Hampstead Mystery
     

The Hampstead Mystery

3.7 10
by Arthur J. Rees
 

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High Court Justice Sir Horace Fewbanks found shot dead in his Hampstead home, a butler with a criminal past, a scorned lover and a hint of scandal. These are the elements of the Hampstead Mystery that Detective Inspector Chippenfield of Scotland Yard must unravel with the assistance of the ambitious Detective Rolfe. But will he be able to sort out the tangled threads

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The Hampstead Mystery 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
the_curious_reader More than 1 year ago
First published in 1916, fans of the English detective genre will find this English murder mystery to be a carefully constructed puzzle with many clever twists and turns right up to the end. Four stars to the book itself, three stars to the publisher for the question marks that occasionally pop up in place of hyphens and word breaks. Careful editing otherwise.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An engaging mystery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I do not pretend to be an expert on sentence structure, but my pet peeve is incorrect spelling and punctuation. When I went to grade school it seemed as though we were always having spelling tests. Now that I am in my 50's, I find myself resorting to dictionaries because I don' t spell as well as I used to. However, with the advent of texting and computers, I cannot seem read anything without finding errors! Your books are no exception. Every one that I have read have mistakes throughout. I didn't even finish the first page of this book without finding a mistake. In fact, I think it was in the first or second sentence. I do not know who you are paying to do this kind of editing, but you are wasting your money. I would be happy to be paid to review some of your books before you release them to the public.