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The Hand That Rocks the Ladle (Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery Series #8)
     

The Hand That Rocks the Ladle (Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery Series #8)

4.6 5
by Tamar Myers
 

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The PennDutch Inn has seen its fair share of murder. But when triplets turn out to be twins, innkeeper Magdalena Yoder must sift out a cradle robber....

Praise for the Pennsylvania Dutch mysteries:

"As sweet as a piece of brown-sugar pie."--Booklist

"[A] humorous culinary mystery that adds an authentic feel to the Pennsylvania-Dutch

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The Hand That Rocks the Ladle (Pennsylvania Dutch Mystery Series #8) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tamar Myers gleefully gets away with spoofing (in good taste) the Amish, Mennonite subcultures. I¿m thinking those communities might proudly read this series, loving Magdalena Yoder's religious outrageousness and pokes at their shared background. Myers gives a delightful view of this culture's ability to bubble with fun just under the surface of what they believe to be necessary religious severity. Maybe everything needs a relief valve. Misquoted idioms are the forte of Freni, Magdalena's cook, who is also a relative (according to Magdalena, most people in a small Mennonite community are related). Instead of 'taking a page out of their book,' Freni suggest to Magdalena that 'You should take a page out of their dictionary.' The people referenced as having the right page/dictionary from which to take are an Amish family who have shunned a relative who has installed rubber tires on his buggy. It seems that in this case rubber tires are too much of a lazy luxury. Might that be why Myers doesn't quite allow herself the gourmet luxury Diane Mott Davidson relishes religiously in her series, with Goldy Schulz catering at the helm? Maybe it's too sensual to watch a character wallowing in luscious details in a cooking process simultaneous to getting a clue. Or, possibly everyone has a different little bit of heaven to take to earth. The included recipes from the Pen Dutch were indeed GOOD. On page 23 of the paperback, 'Bubble and Squeak¿ is featured, which is a gooey, flavor-lush, potato-pancake-thingy fried in bacon grease. (I¿ve never purchased the expensive phobia of cholesterol. My Italian grandmother cooked everything in bacon grease and ate all the current ¿no nos.¿ She lived, actively, to 94 years old. Her second day in any hospital was the day she died, telling my Mom, ¿I¿m going to go to sleep tonight and not wake up, Margie.¿) This novel, an entertaining, gentle, and tasteful exposure of various levels of the Amish culture should remain not only a best-seller in the mass marketplace, it should receive kudos of the highest order as being a landmark offering within the annals of Cultural Conversations.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ms. Myers has a good sense of humor. The murder is someone you won't suspect. I think the main character is a very strong and determined lady. If you like mysteries I think YOU WILL LIKE THIKE THIS BOOK!
Guest More than 1 year ago
All of the Magdalena Yoder books are fabulous, and the recipes are mouth watering, but this book left me missing the Penn Dutch Inn. Seems Mags was so busy helping poor Freni, her cousin many times removed, that she doesn't have time to tend the inn. I have recommended this to many friends, but think it falls just a pinch short of being her best. Although it is not quite up to my personal best, I still can't wait for each new book to reach the stand. Magdalena and Suzanne are such dynamic and colorful characters that they make the books some of the best reading there is. As for Freni, when I read her cooking in that kitchen I can almost smell the aroma of those delicious dishes. Please keep the books coming!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Hernia, Pennsylvania Magdalena Yoder owns and manages the famous Penn Dutch Inn. Though in the center of Amish-Mennonite country, Magdalena has catered to many of our nation's rich and famous. Rather well off due to her successful business, Magdalena is very devoted to her relative Freni and the woman's spouse Mose. The couple is excited that their daughter-in-law Barbara is pregnant with triplets..... However, in the delivery room something unusual happens that changes Freni's elation to worry. Barbara gives birth to twin boys as witnessed by the delivery room doctor, the nurse, and Freni's son. The doctor insists the physician who claimed triplets was simply wrong. Freni believes a third child was born and is now missing. She pleads with Magdalena, who has solved a mystery or two, to investigate neither one aware that murder is involved..... THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE LADLE, the eighth installment in the Magdalena Yoder culinary regional mysteries, retains the freshness and humor of the previous even novels. Tamar Myers continues her mastery by painting an insightful look at the Amish and Mennonite cultures. In a religious way, the very human Magdalena remains as obnoxious, proud, and delightful as she has always been. The entertaining story line is engaging, but it is the captivating characters that serve up this scrumptious, low calorie, but delicious dinner.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In Hernia, Pennsylvania Magdalena Yoder owns and manages the famous Penn Dutch Inn. Though in the center of Amish-Mennonite country, Magdalena has catered to many of our nation¿s rich and famous. Rather well off due to her successful business, Magdalena is very devoted to her relative Freni and the woman¿s spouse Mose. The couple is excited that their daughter-in-law Barbara is pregnant with triplets.

However, in the delivery room something unusual happens that changes Freni¿s elation to worry. Barbara gives birth to twin boys as witnessed by the delivery room doctor, the nurse, and Freni¿s son. The doctor insists the physician who claimed triplets was simply wrong. Freni believes a third child was born and is now missing. She pleads with Magdalena, who has solved a mystery or two, to investigate neither one aware that murder is involved.

THE HAND THAT ROCKS THE LADLE, the eighth installment in the Magdalena Yoder culinary regional mysteries, retains the freshness and humor of the previous even novels. Tamar Myers continues her mastery by painting an insightful look at the Amish and Mennonite cultures. In a religious way, the very human Magdalena remains as obnoxious, proud, and delightful as she has always been. The entertaining story line is engaging, but it is the captivating characters that serve up this scrumptious, low calorie, but delicious dinner.

Harriet Klausner