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The Kaisho (Nicholas Linnear Series #4)
     

The Kaisho (Nicholas Linnear Series #4)

3.4 5
by Eric Van Lustbader
 

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From New York Times bestselling author Eric Lustbader, the suspense mastermind behind the smash bestsellers featuring Robert Ludlum’s™ Jason Bourne, comes a blockbuster thriller of one man’s debt of honor—and his ultimate destiny.

Years ago, Nicholas Linnear, a.k.a. “the Ninja,” made a promise to his father: If a man

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The Kaisho (Nicholas Linnear Series #4) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a great book in 1993 when it was published not 2015 as claimed by B & N. If you read it in 1993 then you don't need to buy the newly published Nook book. If you didn't read it years ago then buy the book.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Those who had read the first saga of Linnear (Ninja - Miko - White Ninja) will get this new one as good as the first. This novel is as complex as the last one (White Ninja). But don't expect the same level in the other two (Floating City - second skin). In this novel, we know three new enemies for Nicholas: Do Duc (a skilled martials artist from VietNam), Michael Laeonforte (don't be fooled: he's skilled too) and Rock (a crazy militar). But the story is not only of the confrontation between them and Nicholas; the confrontation of honor duties of family vs. the own believings of Nicholas, the involvement of a Mob family and a yakuza leader, and the environment in Venice, produce a complex trama that captures you from the beginning to the end. At last: read it or listen it. The novel is excellent.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book as part of an Honors Geography application project. This book is about business, ninjas, and supernatural magic. The author's style of writing is to have multiple descriptive characters. I didn't really care for the style too much because at time it can be very difficult to keep up with the book. I learned a few things about Japan from reading this book. It showed me some of the cultural customs, as well as how business is operated in Japan. This subject of this book kept me enticed. There were some great parts to this book but there were just way too many characters that really hurt the story. As far as the words in the book go, this book was in my reading level, but this book is for people of a more mature level. If you like books that are very vivid and intricate than this is the book for you, if things that are overdone put you off, then you should pass on this book.