×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Testament of Mary
     

The Testament of Mary

4.1 27
by Colm Toibin
 

See All Formats & Editions

“Tóibín is at his lyrical best in this beautiful and daring work” (The New York Times Book Review) that portrays Mary as a solitary older woman still seeking to understand the events that become the narrative of the New Testament and the foundation of Christianity—long-listed for the Man Booker Prize.

In the ancient town of

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Testament of Mary 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 27 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I write as a psychologist. The power of the book lies in engagement with the author's projection of his inner world onto a "little known" yet highly mythologized character, that of Mary the mother of Jesus of Nazareth. The author's tortured inner world betrays qualities of paranoia, depression and cynicism all of which are projected onto the character he portrays. Intensely engaging language and powerful descriptions of anguished inner conflict make for a thought-provoking reading experience. The major theme of belief/disbelief will invite the reader into taking a personal stand.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Testament of Mary is easily one of the most talked about books of the year, and this audio book will only add to the buzz. Brutally honest, we meet the mother of Jesus in her elder years, cared for (or is she kept?), by some of the disciples in the ancient port city of Ephesus. As she reminisces about her experiences, her son's ministry, and the aftermath of his death, she pulls no punches: she is as hard on herself as she is on those who are providing for her. She revisits the wedding at Cana, the raising of Lazarus, and other moments in Jesus' public ministry with an undimmed eye. She brings new insights to many familiar episodes recorded in the gospels, coupled with her own powerful reflections. And if this isn't enough to hold your attention, Meryl Streep's masterful interpretation of the test is mesmerizing. Fluidly told, Streep's reading is compelling and inevitable. She invests the familiar figure of Jesus' mother with grit and absolute integrity. Her reading is nuanced with such skill that you will be tempted to listen to all three discs at one sitting. Go ahead! Be overwhelmed. Let Mary speak without interruption. When she is finished, she will be as strong as she was when she began and you, well, you will be exhausted, drained by her passion and moved by her story. On the page, this narrative is monumental; to the ear, the story is unforgettable. When I bought the recording, it was offered for less money than the book; I bought both, and this is a double purchase I do not regret. You won't either. You may lend one or the other or both to friends and relatives, but you will always want them returned, and you will always know where they are on your bookshelf. This recording is as timeless as the story it tells.
LisaMI More than 1 year ago
It makes no difference if you agree or disagree with this book.  It makes you think.  Great discussion starter for a book club and a short  read that is written very well.  His interview on NPR would also add to the discussion.
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
Haunting and disturbing to hear from Mary's view how heartbreaking and sorrowful the experience of bearing witness to her Son's torture and execution truly was for her. My image of Mary, the Mother of Jesus, has been changed forever, and Toibin's exquisite writing showcases her as a Mother, and how her story really needed to be told.
MexicoDan More than 1 year ago
A bit heretical (from the official Catholic viewpoint), but a beautifully written novella.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This little novella proposes a more realistic, human view of the crucifiction
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Colm Toibin's writing in this (2011) dramatic monilogue now novella (2012) is like an illumination of a discovered ancient writing - vivid in colors and detail. Toibin's 'illumination' provides the reader with poinant insights into the Mother of Jesus which make her accessible and real, and equally so the Christian gospels as ancient narrative. This powerful and engaging quick read provides excellent material for book club discussions or for faith-based conversations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Haunting. Beautifully writing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A decidedly different slant on The Virgin Mary told from the perspective of her older years. Well written with enough historical asides to keep the tale moving forward. While this version does not appeal to me, I appreciated his tenacity and skill in passing the story along.
74scruffy74 More than 1 year ago
9.99 for that few pages, I can't justify the expense
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hope to see the production in New York
umemaru More than 1 year ago
In the debate about the biblical canon it is apparent that choices were made early on regarding what would be included and what would be excluded from Jewish, Catholic and Protestant canons.  Tóibín chooses to write about the choices made concerning the portrayal of Jesus  in the writings of the Gospels. It  seems that the characters who visit Mary, bullies that they are, want her to reinforce the agenda that they have in writing that portrayal; interestingly though unnamed they appear to be John the Evangelist and Paul, who never knew Jesus. Mary is a sad character; the joys of her life with Joseph and in the raising of her (their) son, are gone as Joseph has died and  in her view she loses her son when he begins his mission. She fears for her life even In Ephesus. She does eventually become friendly with a neighboring family of Greeks and goes to the Temple of Artemis in Ephesus. Her descriptions of her life show one of memory, of prayers in the Jewish tradition, and indeed of an understanding of the worship of Artemis as an antidote to the oppression she feels as an ignored woman. A thoughtful book well-written and worth the read.