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The Wind Done Gone: A Novel
     

The Wind Done Gone: A Novel

2.7 45
by Alice Randall
 

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In this daring and provocative literary parody which has captured the interest and imagination of a nation, Alice Randall explodes the world created in GONE WITH THE WIND, a work that more than any other has defined our image of the antebellum South. Taking sharp aim at the romanticized, whitewashed mythology perpetrated by this southern classic, Randall has

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The Wind Done Gone 2.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 45 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have read both Gone with the Wind and seen the movie. I think this book gives a very interesting look into the part of life not shown in any version of Gone with the Wind or any other southern romantic book/movie of that era. I understand that this and Gone with the Wind are both fictional stories. I think that if there is enough room for a fictional romanticized version of southern life...there has to be room for a fictional version of slavery during that time as well. Although I had the knowledge of Gone with the Wind 'book/movie' before reading this book, I could still read The Wind Done Gone without trying to compare it chapter and verse to the classic. I think that is the best way to approach anything like this. I can appreciate how white people lived back then and how a lot of people (black and white)can relate to Gone with the Wind as a love story. I can also appreciate someone taking the time to try and give a little insight into how enslaved Africans and their mulatto children lived DURING THE SAME ERA. It's very easy to dismiss/get angry at this subject in literature b/c it's an uncomfortable topic-but it existed. As a black woman, married to a white man and who has researched the 8 main sides of her ancestry back to 1637-1660 in America and found 'enslaved mulattoes' on all sides of my family from the 1600's through 1900 -I admire her attempt at bringing this topic to light. I hope she has encouraged other people, whether relating their fictional story to a classic or not, to begin/continue shedding light on 'mulatto slave life'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you pick up this book and decide to read it, please leave your prejudices at the door. It is not as bad as those who hate it say, and it is not as good as those who love it say, but it is fun to read if you love southern lit, like I do. Go ahead and read it. I promise that if you do, you can go on to live a normal life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book thinking that it'd be enjoyable, but as much as I tried to understand or enjoy it, I became bored rather quickly. I was determined to stick it out. I wasn't impressed by the names she used for the characters and places of Gone With the Wind. I wouldn't read it again either. I refuse to recommend this book to anyone.
Vovo More than 1 year ago
When I was a young girl, I used to consider myself as 'obsessed' with Gone With the Wind. No other book compared. Even now, I still hold a similar belief. As any Gone With the Wind fan, I was curious to read a novel based on my absolutly favorite book. I was willing to give it a chance. That being said, I was saddened when Mammy and the O'Haras were so degraded by Ms. Randall. Margaret Mitchell was very clear when she wrote about how Mr. O'Hara was utterly besotted with his wife and how Mammy was always so meticulous with what was 'fittin'. The very idea that Mr. O'Hara and Mammy would conceive an illegitimate child is hard to process. Still, I was curious as to whether the story might smooth into cleaner waters with Ms. Randall's lackadaisical writing. Sadly, it did not. The story only went on to make Scarlett a sniveling wretch and Rhett a sexual monster. I must say, though, that Ms. Randall has a unique voice that could develope into some fabulous works. Her use of wording was very tantalizing and exotic, as was her originality in storyline.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At first I was concerned that Alice Randall had betrayed the old south. As I continued to read I was forced to see and embarassed to say that I had not realized it before there was another side to the Pre Civil War old south. I really enoyed this book and felt that Alice Randall presented the other side of the coin wonderfully.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Wind Done Gone was not bad for a first book published. The story was a grabme and quite interesting. My final comment TWDG was a plot, a beginning, middle and conclusion -- I would reccommend to a mature friend. Finally, rearder's if you have nothing good to say don't say anything.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Finally we have the last of the missing pieces to the puzzle. Ms. Randall has offered us a not only a new/different perspective, she has also offered us a sense of value and worth for the ones who have paved the way. Maybe some of the verbage has been altered to bring about a more updated appeal than the literature of 'GWTW'. But I found the book very well written and has led my imagination to places I never thought possible. I belive that if readers are less critical and more open- minded you may find this a very interesting read. Also, the fact of knowing that there is another side of this and every story, the truth lies within. I implore you to read this book and allow yourself the pleasures of both sides.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was greatly excited by Alice Randall's Work of Art. Alice Randall shows great intellect in writing this book and in thereby showing the portrayal of how a majority of African Americans feel in this country regarding Margaret Mitchell's book. As an African American Woman growing up in Atlanta Georgia being forced to read Margaret Mitchell's book in the georgia school system, and residing in Jonesboro (tara), I obviously had lots of emotional baggage attached with 'gone with the wind' and it's impact on the way it portrayed Black African Americans. I definately did not agree with Margaret Mitchell's book because it was one-sided and did not tell the underlying truth by insulting ALL Black African Americans with her damaging feelings about Black People. I thank Alice Randall for giving my Ancestors a Voice to Speak, and for allowing their Souls to Cry Out from beyond the grave. I believe that Alice Randall exhibits true literary thinking by giving America a taste of how we(African Americans)feel about what our people endured being portrayed in a negative light instead of how they really were, which is an Extremely Strong Black People who had emotions, thoughts,feelings, desires, goals,and most of all Human Souls.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is in no way a parody, but I guess they had to stick that on the cover in order to get it published. I gobbled the book up, but it is true that to understand it, you need more than a little knowledge of the original. I thought it was wonderful and true and I think Margaret Mitchell would not have had so much of a problem with it as her estate did. Frankly, I think all the publicity did the book and the author a favor. I guess with all of the hype around the publication, I expected it to be a little more evocative, but I was only a little disappointed. I really enjoyed the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As I read The Wind Done Gone, I find myself thinking ..'I didn't know that, well doesn't that explain a lot.' A throuough knowledge of the original is necessary to fully catch all the references. This book is fascinating. If I were the author of the authorized sequel, Scarlett, I would retire immediately, realizing I had absolutely no idea what I was doing. I cannot help but think, had Margaret Mitchell lived into today's society, she would be equally as enthralled with her characters as I. Can't wait for the movie - Thandy Newton or Halle Berry take note. The role is yours.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I had seen this book referred to as 'a parody' of Gone With the Wind, which is is not. It is a deeply affecting story written from a different perspective - that of a mulatto slave woman, who gives us a new slant on some familiar characters. I was deeply moved. I can understand why Mitchell's literary executors were annoyed; this is a much more satisfying sequel than the one they approved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think these reviews are ridiculous. It's a parody people. That does not require following the original FICTIONAL book to any specific degree with "facts", as one reviewer put it. Get a grip people. Read it for what it is, not for what you want it to be. P.A.R.O.D.Y.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GerreK More than 1 year ago
I think the negative reviews are by those who disagree with the author's premise that "the south" needs to be cleaned up from it's dirty secretive past. Cindy was slapped by "R" when she expressed this truth. Alice Randall's work is receiving the same treatment according to some of the negative comments. Cindy's voice needs to be heard. I believe that we need to be open to different interpretations in order to discern the big picture. This book is worth the time and attention needed to unravel the sad heritage we have inherited from the "peculiar institutio0n" of slavery.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
prettybrowneyes More than 1 year ago
The book threw me off a little bit, but it was a slight ok with me
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I heard about The Wind Done Gone, all I could think about was how much I wanted to read it. I hunted every bookstore down until I found the beautiful cover with the mulatto woman in a green dress. I was positive this was going to be a funny story, a sort of African-American behind-the-scenes of Gone With the Wind. A historical story that gave a voice to the slaves. Sad to say, Ms. Randall wrote a little differently than I had oricinally anticipated. She wrote with the hateful voice of a wronged slave-turned-prostitute. I applaud Ms. Randall's efforts to distort a classic American novel, ruin well-loved characters, and write a book focused on bringing down the work of another author. She greatly succeeded on all points.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read the press releases for The Wind Done Gone as well as various interviews with Alice Randall prior to the release of this book, so it was with some excitement that I anticipated buying this book. I expected a parody. What I got instead was a mean-spirited, soulless, humorless and basically pointless account of a story that runs parallel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone With The Wind. The Wind Done Gone is no parody. Alice Randall committed a direct theft of the characters we already know too well. Randall is a good writer. She has a wonderful talent for imagery and the rhythm of her language is as beautiful as a lullaby. Randall would have done better to write a book featuring characters of her own creation, rather than stealing from Margaret Mitchell. I really hated this book. It struck all the wrong chords and was entertaining only in its overreaching absurdity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an Black woman and I loved GWTW and Scarlett. When I first heard about this book I was very intrigued and couldn't wait to read it. I got the book, read it in two days and really didn't like it. It can't compare to GWTW. I think Alice Randall has potential to be a good author but this book simply did nothing for her. The book was boring and didn't go into much detail about its characters, only Cynara. I do not recommend this book, it is a huge disappointment.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Shaky at first, but as this book unfolds,it is genious! Her word selection is genious and one has to actually THINK when they read the book. I never read Gone With the Wind but this book makes me want to read it. I mean, if Cyn is the "good sister", then Other must be a Scarlet O'hara!(pun). This book seems to be showing the cleverness and subtle ruthlessness of the slaves and what they had to do to survive. Now that I understand the book, I'll read it again after reading Gone With the Wind (the movie is not the same as the book).
Guest More than 1 year ago
i had to stop reading it. it made no sense - especially if you have never read gone with the wind. alice randalls writings dont even begin to compare with margret mitchells. all her book seems to me is some wiritngs to get back at gone with the wind (dunno what for but whatever). i didnt find the book offensive but it was just a poorly written book. im not sure if i will continue reading the book or not.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Naturally, being African American, I was not only interested in reading a novel that was received so many accolades by so many affluent celebraties, but was equally interested to find out what made this book so controversial. The hype is what sells this book. Sadly, I have to say I found the reading boring. It rode off the back of Gone with The Wind with no real substance. I think the author has a poetic talent and the potential of delivering better literature. This one should not have been her first - it needed more - something...
Guest More than 1 year ago
i read this book and loved it.It really sheaded a more true light on Gone with the Wind. Other reveiwers speak as if everyone was truley as gitty as house wives. How do they think the work was accomplished at Tara and through the south on the blood sweat and tears of Blacks. Mammy worked and and sweated just so Scarlett could parade in front of Ashley and bat her eyes. Honestly we have to look at things from other points of view. Don't get me wrong i loved Gone With the Wind but it Protrayed slaves as this gitty lacky animals that were created for the service of whites.All i have to say is God created everyone equal and through Islam and God i've learned that. I enjoyed this book and it's Gothic Neo-slavery image lured me to read on.